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Caribbean International Academy - St. Maarten

   
#4 Tigres Road, Cupecoy, Other, 00000, Netherlands Antilles

ADD TO SHORTLIST   Website
Curriculum:
Traditional
Grades (Gender):
JK to 12 (Coed)
Tuition:
US $9,130 to 32,645/year
Main Language:
English
Avg. Class Size:
5 to 15
Enrolment:
Day: Varies (Gr. JK - 12), Boarding: 8 (Gr. 7 - 12)

School Address
#4 Tigres Road, Cupecoy, Other, 00000 , Netherlands Antilles

About this school:

highlights

The Caribbean International Academy’s campus and educational facilities are state of the art and composed of a main building, a residence for 14 international students, a 25-meter swimming pool and a sports court. The main objective of CIA is to provide a carefully planned, stimulating environment which will help children to develop the foundational habits, attitudes, skills and ideas which are essential for creative thinking, problem solving and a love for life long learning. — Visit school website




Reviews:

highlights

The Our Kids review of Caribbean International Academy - St. Maarten

our takeSuffice it to say, CIA is unique. Most obviously, it’s a boarding school in St. Maarten that offers the Ontario high school graduation diploma. In that regard, it’s the only one of its kind. That said, it’s also a very small, very student-oriented school. The experience is exceptionally personal, in a setting that is exceptionally international. All of the benefits of boarding apply, though the school offers a view of globalism that, too, is unequalled. It isn’t for everyone, to be sure, but for some students, it can provide an inspiring, expansive academic experience.





Principal's Message

principal

Mr. Herb Klassen, Principal

We are an extraordinary Day School and Boarding School in the Dutch Lowlands of Sint Maarten.

CIA is an accredited International School through the Ontario Ministry of Education and is inspected every year. Our graduates receive an Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma and, up to 90% of our students go on to attend College or University in Canada, United States, and Europe. CIA also offers complete pre-school to grade twelve programs. 

International Parents who wish to send their son or daughter to our boarding school to live on campus for a wonderful educational program and an experience of a lifetime, can find all of the information on our website. It also offers the opportunity to research our academic programs as well as detailed curriculum information about the Elementary School and the credit system of our Secondary School. Information about the many extracurricular activities offered at CIA is in our monthly newsletter as well as pictures and articles on our website. 

The Caribbean International Academy faculty are highly trained professionals who are involved in all aspects of school life. They strive to engage each student through personalized attention with studies as well as by participating in a wide range of extra-curricular activities. The positive atmosphere created by our teachers allows our students unique opportunities to grow both academically and as an individual. 

Administration members aim to set their students up for success. They play an integral role in each students personalized journey at CIA. The teachers give students one on one aid in course selection, after school tutoring and even help to guide students regarding their future studies beyond secondary school. Our faculty are knowledgeable professionals who are creative, compassionate and dedicated to fostering an optimal learning environment for all students.


 


Academics


Curriculum Traditional

Primary Curriculum: Traditional


What CIA says: Caribbean International Academy is an accredited International School through the Ontario Ministry of Education. Our graduates receive an Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma. Caribbean International Academy is committed to promoting a caring goal-oriented environment that fosters academic excellence, personal growth and a love for life long learning. It is the goal of CIA to prepare students for post secondary education and other pathways of success. Caribbean International Academy believes that education must address the whole person. The Academy has been established to provide academic and extracurricular programs that support the development of students emotionally, physically and intellectually. Caribbean International Academy upholds a respect for human diversity, a tolerance for beliefs different from our own, and a compassion for others. CIA encourages individual and social responsibility and promotes a balanced lifestyle in school as well as in community and after- school activities.

  • Approach:
    Focus
    Academic


  • Pedagogies and subject courses:

  • Mathematics Equal Balance

      These math programs feature an equal balance of “Traditional” and “Discovery” methods.
      Learn about the different mathematics approaches  


    • What CIA says: The choice of specific concepts and skills to be taught must take into consideration new applications and new ways of doing mathematics. “In an effective mathematics program, students learn in the presence of technology. Technology should influence the mathematics content taught and how it is taught. Powerful assistive and enabling computer and handheld technologies should be used seamlessly in teaching, learning, and assessment.” CIA's curriculum integrates appropriate technologies into the learning and doing of mathematics, while recognizing the continuing importance of students’ mastering essential numeric and algebraic skills.

    • Textbooks and supplementary materials: - Mathematics 7 Textbook, Nelson - Mathematics 8 Textbook, Nelson - Principles of Mathematics 9 Textbook, McGraw Hill - Principles of Mathematics 10, McGraw-Hill - Functions 11, McGraw - Math 11 with CD-Rom - Calculus & Vectors 12

    • Calculator policy: Calculators are changing the role of procedure and technique in mathematics. Operations that were an essential part of a procedures-focused curriculum can now be accomplished quickly and effectively, so that students can now solve problems that were previously too time-consuming to attempt, and can focus on underlying concepts.


    Early Reading Balanced Literacy

      Balanced reading programs are typically Whole Language programs with supplementary phonics training. This training might be incidental, or it might take the form of mini-lessons.
      Learn about the different early reading approaches  


    • What CIA says: This information is not currently available.

    • DIBELS Testing: This school does not use DIBELS testing to assess reading progress.

    • What CIA says: This information is not currently available.


    Writing Equal balance

      Programs that balance systematic and process approaches equally likely have an emphasis on giving young students ample opportunities to write, while providing supplementary class-wide instruction in grammar, parts of sentences, and various writing strategies.
      Learn about the different writing approaches  


    • What CIA says: This information is not currently available.


    Science Equal Balance

      Science programs that balance expository and inquiry learning equally will likely have an equal blend of tests and experiments; direct, textbook-based instruction and student-centred projects.
      Learn about the different science approaches  


    • Teaching approach: Achievement of both excellence and equity underlies the three major goals of CIA's science program. The Ontario Curriculum therefore outlines not only the skills and knowledge that students are expected to develop but also the attitudes that they will need to develop in order to use their knowledge and skills responsibly. The three goals of the science program are as follows: 1. to relate science to technology, society, and the environment 2. to develop the skills, strategies, and habits of mind required for scientific inquiry 3. to understand the basic concepts of science Every course in the secondary science program focuses on these three goals. The goals are reflected within each strand of every course in the three overall expectations, which in turn are developed in corresponding sets of related specific expectations. The same three goals also underlie assessment of student achievement in science.

    • Topics covered in curriculum:

      Subject = offered
      Biology
      Chemistry
      Ecology
      Geology
      Meteorology
      Physics
      Physiology
      Zoology
    • Treatment of evolution:

      Evolution as consensus theory
      Evolution as one of many equally viable theories
      Evolution is not taught

    Literature Equal Balance

      These literature programs draw in equal measure from “Traditional” and “Social Justice” programs.
      Learn about the different literature approaches  


    • What CIA says: CIA's English curriculum is dedicated to developing the knowledge and skills on which literacy is based – that is, knowledge and skills in the areas of listening and speaking, reading, writing, and viewing and representing. Language development is central to students’ intellectual, social, cultural, and emotional growth and must be seen as a key component of the curriculum. When students learn to use language, they do more than master the basic skills. They learn to value the power of language and to use it responsibly. They learn to express feelings and opinions and to support their opinions with sound arguments and evidence from research. They become aware of the many purposes for which language is used and the diverse forms it can take to serve particular purposes and audiences. Students learn that language can be not only used as a tool but also appreciated and enjoyed.


    Social Studies Thematic

      The Thematic approach organizes the curriculum around certain themes or cultural universals. Students might spend time focused on food. Then they might focus on transportation or government, and so on.
      Learn about the different social studies approaches  


    • What CIA says: The six concepts of social studies thinking – significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change, patterns and trends, interrelationships, perspective – underpin all thinking and learning in social studies. In Grades 1–6, at least one concept of social studies thinking is identified as the focus for each overall expectation.


    Humanities and Social Sciences Equal Balance

      These programs represent an equal balance between the perennialist and pragmatic approach to teaching the humanities and social sciences.
      Learn about the different humanities and social sciences approaches  


    • What CIA says: The expectations for the Grade 7 to 12 social sciences and humanities courses are organized into distinct but related strands. The first strand focuses on research and inquiry skills; the remaining strands, which vary in number from course to course, represent the major content areas for each course. The research and inquiry skills are organized under subheadings related to the four stages of inquiry – exploring, investigating, processing information, and communicating and reflecting. • Exploring skills include the ability to identify and refine topics and identify key concepts. • Investigating skills include the ability to create research plans; develop research tools; locate relevant sources; and formulate hypotheses. • Processing information skills include the ability to assess sources, organize and synthesize findings, document sources, and formulate conclusions. • Communicating and reflecting skills include the ability to use appropriate modes of communication for a specific purpose and audience.


    Foreign Languages Equal Balance

      These programs feature an equal blend of the audio-lingual and communicative styles of language instruction.
      Learn about the different foreign languages approaches  


    • What CIA says: The expectations for Foreign Languages are organized into four distinct but interrelated strands: A. Listening B. Speaking C. Reading D. Writing The language structures, grammar, and language learning skills in the four strands overlap with and strengthen one another. Effective instructional activities often blend expectations from two or more strands in order to provide students with the kinds of experiences that promote meaningful learning. Students can develop skills covered in multiple strands by engaging in richly integrated tasks such as participating in a debate on a current issue, discussing strategies for organizing ideas in a writing assignment, or offering constructive and descriptive feedback about work produced by their peers. The CIA Foreign Language program provides daily opportunities for students to engage in various oral activities in connection with expectations in all four strands.

    • Studying a foreign language is required until:   10
    • Languages Offered: • French • Spanish


    Fine Arts Equal Balance

      These programs have an equal emphasis on receptive and creative learning.
      Learn about the different fine arts approaches  


    • Program offers:

      Subject = offered
      Acting
      Dance
      Drama/Theatre
      Graphic Design
      Music
      Visual Arts
    • Visual studio philosophy:

      Expressive
      Disciplined
    • What CIA says: The expectations in all CIA Fine Arts courses are organized in three distinct but related strands, which are as follows: A. Creating and Presenting or Creating and Performing or Creating, Presenting, and Performing (depending on the arts subject) B. Reflecting, Responding, and Analyzing C. Foundations Students are expected to learn and use the creative process to help them acquire and apply knowledge and skills in the arts. Use of the creative process is to be integrated with use of the critical analysis process in all facets of the arts curriculum as students work to achieve the expectations in the three strands. The creative process comprises several stages: • challenging and inspiring • imagining and generating • planning and focusing • exploring and experimenting • producing preliminary work • revising and refining • presenting and performing • reflecting and evaluating


    Computers and Technology Medium integration

      Effort is made to integrate the development of digital literacy through the curriculum. However, this is not a dominant focus.
      Learn about the different computers and technology approaches  


    • What CIA says: Technological innovation influences all areas of life, from the daily lives of individuals to the work of business and government, to interactions on a global scale. It helps meet basic human needs and provides tools for improving people’s lives and exploring new frontiers. CIA's technology policy is designed to ensure that technological education enables students to meet the challenges and opportunities of the twenty-first century.

    • Program covers:

      Subject = offered
      Computer science
      Robotics
      Web design

    Physical Education
    • What CIA says: The expectations for the Healthy Active Living Education courses are organized into three distinct but related strands – Active Living, Movement Competence, and Healthy Living. Integral to expectations in all these strands is a further set of expectations, presented at the start of each grade. These are the living skills – the personal, interpersonal, and critical and creative thinking skills that are essential to the achievement of expectations in the three strands. The living skills expectations are to be taught and evaluated in conjunction with learning in each of the strands. They make the learning in the Healthy Active Living Education courses personally relevant to students, as students learn to apply them in a variety of contexts that relate to their everyday lives.


    Sex and Health Education
    Topics covered in sex and health education:
    Topics We begin covering this topic at:
    Body parts Gr. 4
    Nutrition Gr. 1
    Human development Gr. 5
    Puberty Gr. 5
    Sexual health and hygiene Gr. 7
    Reproduction Gr. 7
    Pregnancy Gr. 7
    Sexually transmitted infections Gr. 7
    Sex and decision-making Gr. 7
    Contraception Gr. 7
    Consent Gr. 7
    Sexual orientation Gr. 7
    Gender identity Gr. 7
    Misconceptions relating to sexuality Gr. 7
    Relationships and intimacy Gr. 7
    Bias and stereotyping about sex Gr. 7
    Sexual harassment Gr. 7
    Body image issues Gr. 7
    Mental illness Gr. 9
    Social justice and diversity Gr. 9

    What CIA says: This information is not currently available.

    Approach:
    Mostly value-neutral

    By and large, we teach sex education free of any particular moral or ethical standpoint. We try not to impose any particular values or value systems (such as social, political, or ideological values) on our students when teaching sex and related issues.


    Fairly value-based

    Sex education is sometimes taught from a particular moral or ethical standpoint. Sometimes particular values or value systems (such as social, political, or ideological values) are invoked when teaching sex and related issues.

    Traditional

    This includes a range of positions. A traditional approach might, for example, go as far as emphasizing the nuclear family and complete abstinence from sex before marriage. Alternatively, this approach might simply involve placing less emphasis on sex outside of the context of marriage and more emphasis on abstinence. Or finally, it might just involve focusing less on sex outside of the context of marriage.

    Progressive

    This might mean more emphasis is placed on the importance of such things as social equality, diversity, and choice in sex education.


    What CIA says: Human development and sexual health education is more than simply teaching young people about the anatomy and physiology of reproduction. Sexual health, understood in its broadest sense, can include a wide range of topics and concepts, from sexual development, reproductive health, choice and sexual readiness, consent, abstinence, and protection, to interpersonal relationships, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, affection and pleasure, body image, and gender roles and expectations.



    Montessori Approach

    CLASSROOM PRACTICES
    SCHOOL POLICIES: This information is not currently available.

    Whole-class lectures
    • Orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should never be given. Students learn best through small group lessons, interaction, and independent work.

    • Moderately orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should only be given occasionally (e.g., at the beginning of a term or unit). Students usually learn best through small group lessons, interaction, and independent work.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should be given semi-regularly (e.g., at the beginning of a lesson or a week). While students often learn best through group and independent work, it's sometimes important for teachers to set the stage for and contextualize learning.

    • Non-orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should be given often (e.g., every day). While group and independent learning is important, teachers need to provide lectures on a regular basis to provide the foundation for learning.



    Special education
    • Orthodox

      External special education support isn't necessary. Core teachers can deal with all special education needs, by offering the relevant support for each student.

    • Moderately orthodox

      External special education support is only rarely necessary. For instance, a psychologist might be brought in to help out a student with a severe developmental disorder.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      External special education support is quite important. Outside specialists are needed for a fairly wide range of special needs, such as developmental and learning disabilities.

    • Non-orthodox

      External special education support is very important. Outside specialists are regularly brought in to support students with many different types of special needs, including developmental and learning disabilities, language and speech issues, behavioural issues, and advanced learning abilities.



    Specialist classes
    • Orthodox

      We don't have any specialist teachers or classes. Core teachers are well-equipped to teach all subjects.

    • Moderately orthodox

      We only use specialist teachers and classes in rare cases (for instance, to teach a second language). Core teachers are well-equipped to teach almost all subjects.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      We have a fairly wide range of specialist teachers and classes (for instance, in languages, music, and art). Core teachers are well-equipped to teach most subjects.

    • Non-orthodox

      We have many specialist teachers and classes (for instance, in languages, music, art, gym, science, and math). It's important that students receive specialized instruction in many subjects.



    Modern-day technology
    • Orthodox

      Modern-day technology is never used in the classroom. This can interfere with students' social and emotional development and can be a distraction.

    • Moderately orthodox

      Modern-day technology is very rarely used in class, since it can be a distraction and interfere with development. Students at the upper levels, though, might be permitted to use a computer or a tablet to do research for a specific project.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      Modern-day technology is used in moderation since it can be a distraction. For instance, computers and other digital media might be used for research, writing, and multimedia projects.

    • Non-orthodox

      Modern technology is used fairly regularly. For instance, computers and other digital media might be used for research, writing, multimedia projects, and to learn keyboarding skills. Teachers may sometimes also use digital media, such as interactive whiteboards, to teach lessons or introduce topics.



    Overall approach : Whick option best describes your overall curricular approach?
    • Orthodox
      38% of schools

      Schools that adhere strictly to the original Montessori program. They follow Montessori principles to the letter.

    • Moderately Orthodox
      34% of schools

      Schools that adhere to the original Montessori program and principles. On occasion, though, they supplement it with modern curricular approaches or materials.

    • Moderately Non-Orthodox
      12% of schools

      Schools that are faithful to the original Montessori program and principles, but sometimes supplement it with modern curricular approaches or materials.

    • Non-orthodox
      16% of schools

      Schools that are faithful to the original Montessori program and principles, but often supplement it with modern curricular approaches or materials.


    Teaching Assistants:

    Preschool/K Curriculum Montessori

    • Play-based
    • Montessori
    • Waldorf
    • Reggio Emilia
    • Academic

    Montessori programs aimed at preschool and Kindergarten- aged children allow young learners to choose which “tasks” or activities interest them. These tasks centre around special Montessori puzzles -- the essential features of these puzzles being they contain a “right answer” and allow for self-correction. A strong emphasis is therefore placed on learning being concrete and rooted in practical experience, along with children developing a sense of self-sufficiency and confidence. Specially trained teachers act as guides, introducing children to progressively more difficult materials when appropriate. A Montessori classroom is typically very calm and orderly, with children working alone or, sometimes, in small groups.

    If you want to learn more about Montessori education, check out our comprehensive guide. You can also check out our guide to Montessori preschools, elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools.

    If you want to learn more about preschool education, check out our comprehensive guide. You can also read our in-depth answers to important preschool questions: What is preschool? What are the main preschool programs? What are the main pros and cons of preschool? What do children learn in preschool? How much does preschool cost?  What makes for a great preschool?

    What CIA says: Kindergarten at CIA fosters a child’s innate passion to learn and achieve his/her full potential through individualized, academic programs and teacher education.


    Curriculum Pace Standard-enriched

    • Standard-enriched
    • Accelerated
    • Student-paced

    Broadly-speaking, the main curriculum -- like that of most schools -- paces the provincially-outlined one. This pace is steady and set by the teachers and school. The curriculum might still be enriched in various ways: covering topics more in-depth and with more vigor than the provincial one, or covering a broader selection of topics.

    Flexible pacing:

    Flexible pacing style = offered
    Subject-streaming (tracking)
    Multi-age classrooms as standard
    Ability-grouping (in-class) as common
    Frequent use of cyber-learning (at-their-own-pace)
    Regular guided independent study opportunities
    Differentiated assessment

    What CIA says about flexible pacing: This information is not currently available.


    Academic Culture Supportive

    • Rigorous
    • Supportive

    A school with a “supportive” academic culture focuses more on process than short-term outcomes: academic performance is a welcomed side-benefit, but not the driving focus. This does not mean the school lacks standards, or has low expectations for its students: a school can have a supportive academic culture and still light the fire of ambition in its students. It does mean, however, the school provides a less intensive culture than schools with a “rigorous” academic classification, and is focused more simply on instilling a love of learning and life-long curiosity.

    What CIA says: The main objective of the Caribbean International Academy is to provide a carefully planned, stimulating environment which will help children, • Develop a positive attitude toward the school and learning. • Develop a sense of high self-esteem. • Build habits of concentration for lifelong study skills. • Develop and foster an abiding curiosity. • Develop habits of initiative and persistence. • Foster inner discipline and a sense of order. • Acquire the basic skills necessary for a lifetime of learning.


    Developmental Priorities Balanced, Intellectual

    Primary Developmental Priority: Balanced
    Equal attention is paid to a balance of priorities: intellectual, emotional, social, and physical.

    Secondary Developmental Priority: Intellectual
    Academically strong, creative, and critical thinkers, capable of exercising rationality, apprehending truth, and making aesthetic distinctions.

    What CIA says: Caribbean International Academy is committed to promoting a caring goal-oriented environment that fosters academic excellence, personal growth and a love for life long learning. It is the goal of CIA to prepare students for post secondary education and other pathways of success.


    Special Needs Support Limited

    Limited

    CIA offers limited support for students with learning difficulties or special needs.

    • Academic Support:
      Support Type = offered
      Learning strategy and study counselling; habit formation
      Extra support and minor accommodations for children experiencing subclinical difficulties

    Gifted Learner Support No Support

    CIA does not offer any specialized programming for gifted learners.

    Gifted education: If you want to learn more about gifted education, check out our comprehensive guide. It’s the first of its kind: it covers different kinds of gifted schools and programs, and a whole host of issues parents face in finding the right option for their gifted child.

    Homework Policy

    In grade 12, Caribbean International Academy - St. Maarten students perform an average of 1.5 hours of homework per night.

    Nightly Homework
    PSJKSK123456789101112
    CIA 0 mins0 mins0 mins15 mins15 mins15 mins30 mins30 mins45 mins45 mins45 mins60 mins60 mins90 mins90 mins
    Site Average2 mins5 mins7 mins16 mins18 mins24 mins29 mins34 mins40 mins54 mins58 mins71 mins81 mins97 mins109 mins

    Report Card Policy

    How assessments are delivered across the grades:

    Lettered or numbered gradesPreschool to 12
    Prose (narrative)-based feedbackPreschool to 12
    Academic achievement reportingPreschool to 12
    Habits and behaviour reportingPreschool to 12
    Parent-teacher meetingsPreschool to 12

    Class Sizes Not available

    This information is not currently available.

    Recess Policy

     GradesJKSK12345678
    Non-lunch recessFrequency No recess No recess
    Location
    Amount
    Lunch recessAmount 30 30

    What CIA says: This information is not currently available.

    Non-lunch recesses: All of this school’s non-lunch recesses take place between classes or academic periods.


    Extracurriculars

    principal
    What CIA says:

    This information is not currently available.


    • Sports OfferedCompetitiveRecreational
      Baseball
      Basketball
      Cycling
      Football
      Ice Hockey
      Lacrosse
      Rowing
      Rugby
      Running
      Soccer
      Softball
      Swimming
      Tennis
      Track & Field
      Volleyball
      Martial Arts
    • Clubs Offered
      Art Club
      Astronomy Club
      Chess Club
      Choir
      Community Service
      Computer Club
      Dance Club
      Debate Club
      Drama Club
      Environmental Club
      Photography
      Poetry/Literature club
      School newspaper
      Student Council
      Yearbook
      Yoga

    Tuition & Financial Aid

    Tuition

     
    JKSK123456789101112
    DayUS $9,130US $9,900US $10,450US $10,725
    Boarding (International)US $32,645
    What CIA says: CIA offers boarding rates for students wishing to return home on week-ends. For Monday to Friday boarding, the rates are: USD $29,165

    Discounts

    Discount TypeEnrollment TypeAmount
    2nd child (sibling)all students$550


    Need-based financial aid

    This information is not currently available.



    Merit based Scholarships

    This information is not currently available.


    Enrollment

    Total enrollment 8
    Average enrollment per grade1
    Average class size5 to 15
    Gender (grades)JK to 12 (Coed)
    Boarding offered Gr. 7 - 12
    % in boarding (total enrollment)100%
    % in boarding (grade-eligible)6%

    If you want to learn more about boarding schools, check out our comprehensive guide.


    Student distribution:

    123456789101112
    Day Enrollment44771116242423192220
    Boarding Enrollment21

    Admission

    Application

    Admissions Assessments:

    Assessment = requiredGrades
    InterviewK - 12
    SSAT
    SSAT (out of province)
    Entrance Exam(s)
    Entrance Essay
    Application Fee

    Application Deadlines:

    Day students:
    Rolling

    Boarding students:
    Rolling


    What CIA says:

    Application Process

    • Official transcript and current report card from previous schools attended

    • Copy of passport

    • Interview and tour of the facility

     

    Admissions Process

    Listed below are the items you will need to submit to the Admissions office

    • One passport picture

    • Copy of a valid health insurance policy

    • Student health record/Immunization record                                                    

    • Tuition/contract agreement

    • Copy of parent passport or ID signing contract

    • Enrollment fees

    • Complete and upload one digital picture to the online application form



    Acceptance

    Acceptance Rate:

    100%

    Type of student Caribbean International Academy - St. Maarten is looking for: CIA students are curious, self starters, motivated, book smart and street smart. CIA students can take on the world.


    Day Boarding

    Student Entry Points

    Student TypeJKSK123456789101112
    Day Acceptance
    (Acceptance rate)
    1 - 8 (100%)01 - 12 (100%)1 - 12 (100%)1 - 13 (100%)1 - 13 (100%)1 - 8 (100%)1 - 6 (100%)001 - 5 (100%)1 - 10 (100%)1 - 10 (100%)1 - 10 (100%)
    Boarding Acceptance
    (Acceptance rate)
    1 - 2 (100%)1 - 2 (100%)1 - 2 (100%)1 - 2 (100%)1 - 2 (100%)

    University Placement

    highlights
    Services = offered
    Career planning
    Internships
    Mentorship Program
    University counseling
    Key Numbers
    Average graduating class size24
    *Canadian "Big 6" placements14
    **Ivy+ placements2

    *Number of students in 2015 who attended one of McGill, U of T, UBC, Queen's University, University of Alberta, or Dalhousie University.

    **Number of students since 2005 that attended one of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, Dartmouth, Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Stanford, University of Chicago, Oxford or Cambridge (UK)

    Schools our students are admitted to (last 4 years): Concordia University University of Ottawa Berkley College of Music Pepperdine College University of Glasgow Montreal University University of Toronto McGill University Princeton University
    Schools our students attend (last 4 years): Concordia University University of Ottawa Berkley College of Music Pepperdine College University of Glasgow Montreal University University of Toronto McGill University

    What Caribbean International Academy - St. Maarten says:

  • Over 95% of CIA's graduating students go on to study in world class Universities in England, Canada, Holland, USA, Scotland, France and more.

  • Social Feeds




    Other Highlights:


    Next Steps


    The most direct action you can take is to plan a school visit. This is the best way to learn more about a school, and requires no obligation.





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