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Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth

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Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth  


  • Type:
    Day camp, After-school / weekend classes, Virtual Camp/Program
  • Focus:
    Technology
  • Cost:
    $150 to $495/month
  • Ages:
    6 to 18
  • Gender:
    Coed
  • Main language:
    English
  • Capacity:
    Varies
  • Programs:
Request more info
  • Summary Profile

    About Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth

    Zebra Robotics inspires kids in grades 1 to 12 to be great problem solvers while promoting creativity and critical thinking in our fun, hands-on robotics and coding programs. Apply STEM concepts and learn to design, build, and program robots. Learn real-world programming skills in Scratch, Minecraft, Game Design, Web/App Development, Python and more. We run after school and weekend classes and camps, delivered in person and online. 

    Many Zebra students compete in robotics competitions to further enrich their STEM experience. There's plenty of excitement and adrenaline for our robotics teams! While it's fun, students learn important life skills like team work, communication and resilience.

    Book a free trial class today!

    • Special needs: Yes, mild support. A few of our campers have special needs.
    • LGBTQ+ friendly community


    COVID-19 Response 

    We’re taking extra precautions to provide a safe in person learning environment for our students and staff. As the provincial Covid-19 guidelines continue to evolve, we're following the latest guidance at our school. While wearing masks is no longer mandatory, we strongly encourage students and staff to wear a mask during class. We respect the decision each family makes, and we want to continue to foster an inclusive and supportive learning environment for everyone.

    Our school has a new commercial grade Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) system connected to our heating and cooling unit that continuously supplies fresh air throughout the building. All classrooms and reception area each have a large, dedicated air purifier unit with a HEPA filter to further clean the air.

    Furthermore, we have enhanced cleaning of our equipment and furniture. Hand sanitizers are available in all classrooms and common area. We encourage everyone to use the hand sanitizers provided.

    Thank you for your understanding and support.

    View recent COVID-19 updates from Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth


    Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth - profile photo

    Video Gallery

  • Programs, Rates & Dates

    Programs and Sessions Calendar

    Choose the right programs and sessions for your child; Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth currently has 15 programs available; 1 TBD.

    Filter activities :


    Choose location:

    Name
    Type/Gender
    Specialty
    Location
    Date
    Bus
     Cost
    Email
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 8 - 13
    Minecraft, STEM
    $150
    Animation|Gaming|Minecraft|Technology|Video Game Design|Video Game Development|Instructor lead (group)|Math|STEAM|STEM
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 6 - 11
    Scratch, Animation
    $150
    Storytelling|Animation|Gaming|Scratch|Technology|Video Game Design|Video Game Development|Instructor lead (group)|Creative writing|Makerspace|Math|STEAM|STEM|Writing
    Virtual Program
    Coed
    Ages: 6 - 11
    Scratch, Animation
    $150
    Virtual Program,
    Apr 07-Dec 31$150
    Storytelling|Animation|Gaming|Scratch|Technology|Video Game Design|Video Game Development|Instructor lead (group)|Creative writing|Makerspace|Math|STEAM|STEM|Writing
    Virtual Program
    Coed
    Ages: 9 - 12
    Video Game Design, STEM
    $150
    Virtual Program,
    Apr 07-Dec 31$150
    Animation|Gaming|Technology|Video Game Design|Video Game Development|Instructor lead (group)|Makerspace|Math|STEM
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 6 - 8
    Robotics, STEM
    $160
    Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 8 - 10
    Robotics, LEGO
    $160
    Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 9 - 12
    Robotics, STEM
    $180
    Scratch|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 12 - 17
    Robotics, STEM
    $180
    Python|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Class/league/program
    Coed
    Ages: 9 - 12
    Scratch, Animation
    $150
    Storytelling|Animation|Gaming|Scratch|Technology|Video Game Design|Video Game Development|Instructor lead (group)|Makerspace|Math|STEAM|STEM
    Virtual Program
    Coed
    Ages: 9 - 11
    Scratch, Animation
    $150
    Virtual Program,
    Apr 07-Dec 31$150
    Storytelling|Animation|Gaming|Scratch|Technology|Video Game Design|Video Game Development|Instructor lead (group)|Makerspace|Math|STEAM|STEM
    Virtual Program
    Coed
    Ages: 11 - 18
    Web Development, Web Design
    $170
    Virtual Program,
    Apr 07-Dec 31$170
    Mixed Media|Animation|Technology|Web Design|Web Development|Instructor lead (group)|Math|STEAM|STEM
    Arts & Crafts|3D Design|3D Printing|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Arts & Crafts|3D Design|3D Printing|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Arts & Crafts|3D Design|3D Printing|Scratch|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Arts & Crafts|3D Design|3D Printing|Python|Scratch|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Engineering|STEAM|STEM
    Arts & Crafts|Scratch|Robotics|Technology|Instructor lead (group)|Creative writing|Language Instruction|LEGO|Makerspace|Math|Reading|Engineering|STEAM|STEM|Writing



    Financial Aid & Payment Details

    Payment Options:

    Credit card payment Yes

    Discounts

    Discount for 2nd child 10%
  • Insider Reviews & Perspectives

    Editor's Review

    Three Things: Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth

    Hear the three things that Our Kids’ editors see when they look at Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth



    User reviews of Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth  — Read all 4 reviews


    Coding Classes
    Anne (Parent)

    Excellent for kids! The instructors are great and keep the class engaged. Highly recommend!

    Summer Camp
    Jennifer V. (Parent)

    My daughter did one week of coding camp and immediately signed up for a second week. She had so much fun with her instructor, she learned a lot and it provided a good challenge too. The owner is quick to respond, accommodating and flexible. My daughter will be back to take more courses for sure ... Read More

    Summer Camp
    Loralie P. (Parent)

    My daughters attended Zebra's coding camps and LOVED it! The coaches did an amazing job, they all learned a ton and had fun too! Thank you so much Zebra Robotics Toronto Danforth!

    Coding Classes
    Delia Y. (Parent)

    Excellent program! My daughter always looks forward to her classes and is already learning so much. Exceptional coach, very knowledgeable and approachable. Management is always professional and helpful. Highly recommend!!

  • Location & Site Details

    Address

    Riverdale, Toronto
    298 Danforth Avenue, 2nd Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M4K 1N6
    Online
    Virtual Program

  • What's New

    Stories

    • Want To Learn Real Coding?

      Written by Philip Huffman

      Source: Zebra Robotics Blog 

      As you might have heard, in the future there will be two kinds of people. One who knows to code and the rest who wish they know. There is a rush to learn and introduce kids to code at an early age. Major corporations like Microsoft, Google, and Facebook to name a few have invested several millions of dollars to get kids excited about coding.

      CRoC Coding Hackathon

      Croc Coding Hackathon

      But Why?

      As per the authors of The Second Machine Age Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, Human development index has accelerated in the last few decades, and is on a vertical trajectory. It is mainly fueled by revolution in the Information Technology field. Coding has become mainstream and the need for everyone to know how to code will be considered an essential skill in the future.

      Image courtesy: The Second Machine Age

      Per a recent survey in North America, close a million jobs paying over $100,000/year will go unfilled with no qualifying candidates to choose from. That is a major problem for the corporations, as we are automating everything now, be it on the factory floor or legal work or shopping or even health care diagnosis. Coding, which provides Artificial Intelligence, powers everything. We need more people who can code.

      But where do you start. I’d say ,start early and continue to learn through your life. Technology is changing at a rapid pace. What was revolutionary few years back is common feature few years later. You want to keep yourself up to date.

      Which course is right for my kid?

      With so many places that teaches Coding, it can be a daunting task to choose the right place and correct coding language to start with. It is important to not get influenced by fancy jargons. Instead focus on choosing a programming language that is age appropriate. For example, when some one tells me that their Grade 4 kid knows Python, or Java because they learned from ‘that’ place, I am skeptical. Many places tell parents that their kid is learning to program in high level languages, when in fact they are using block-based coding, which creates Python or Java code behind it.

      It is important for kids to learn the right way, and it helps if it is age appropriate. I know everyone’s kid is a little genius, but un reasonable expectation may dissuade that kid from pursuing coding as they grow.

      At Zebra Robotics, we always want to take our students to the level where they learn real programming languages as early as in middle school. Prior to that they focus on learning coding concepts in a fun way.

      High school and middle school students learn real programming languages such as Python, Java, JavaScript, C++ and other languages that provide solid foundation when students are ready for universities. Just as learning Math or music is not an one week activity, learning to Code isn’t either. Mastery of text based programming languages, trains your way of thinking and takes time. Thinking logically and troubleshooting eventually becomes second nature.

      We hope you will be interested to learn to code. Call us or walk to one of our locations to try our courses. Who knows your student may fall in love with coding, as many of our students have discovered themselves.

    • Why Your School Needs Zebra Robotics

      Written by Glen Herbert

      Source: glenherbert.com

      For many educators it’s been a struggle to meet the requirements of the new Ontario coding curriculum. What if you didn’t have to?  

      In June 2020 coding was introduced into the Ontario math curriculum for the first time. For a range of reasons, it understandably caused more than a few ripples in the educational community. The new math curriculum was dropped in the midst of a pandemic, with teachers at that point still getting their heads around remote learning. The refinements to Discovery Math itself created a need for professional development. 

      The addition of coding, though, doubled that. One of the curricular expectations, as worded in the provincial document, asks that students be able to “create computational representations of mathematical situations by writing and executing code.” That’s an expectation for Grade 1. The complexity of the expectations of course grows from there to Grade 8. By the time they get to high school, students are required, per the wording of the provincial document, to create code that “involves the analysis of data in order to inform and communicate decisions.” 

      What now?

      It’s a lot, and teachers were right to be resistant. Mary Reid, assistant professor of math education at OISE commented at the time that the material is unfamiliar for many teachers, herself included. “How do you teach computational representation of coding in Grade 1 when that has never been part of your landscape of teaching math?” she said. “We can’t simply give teachers a new document and say, ‘Go teach it.’” 

      The fact is they may not have to. There are other options, especially in the more agile environment of private and independent schools. Satish Thiyagarajan, the co-founder of Zebra Robotics, has been effectively teaching to the Ontario coding curriculum for the better part of a decade. He’s long offered  afterschool and discovery sessions, often in partnership with schools. With the new curriculum, says Thiyagarajan, “I think there is a unique value that we bring to the table. I think we’re in the perfect spot to help schools.”

      To that end, Thiyagarajan and his team have been developing more expansive programs in partnership with area schools ranging from co-curricular coaching to a full academic offering. At Milton Christian School, an early adopter of the concept, they’ve been developing a program to teach the coding expectations, in house, in consort with the math department there. “We said we would pilot it,” says Thiyagarajan, “and it’s coming along really well.” Zebra Robotics staff attend the school two days a week when classes are in person, and are online when they aren’t. 

      High order concepts from a kid’s-eye-view

      For Milton Christian, it’s a very attractive solution. Rather than investing in professional development, they bring in educators who know the field and have tested lessons and approaches, arriving with them in hand. In addition, part of the value equation that the coaches at Zebra offer is a unique ability to translate very technical curricular expectations—e.g. “create computational representations of mathematical situations”—into active, engaging learning. “Some kids can sit in front of a computer,” says Thiyagarajan “but some kids are high energy kids.” The coaching that they’ve developed and tested gets kids out of their seats, working collaboratively together, around shared, dynamic projects. 

      That’s been his goal, from the start: to be educational, but also to be active, exciting, and to come at everything from a kid’s-eye view. It began at home, now nearly a decade ago; Thiyagarajan’s son loved robotics and, at the time, there wasn’t much opportunity to pursue that interest. So he started teaching him. Soon, his son’s friends wanted to come along as well, so they did. With a move from the US to Canada, he decided to try the concept with a bigger audience. Thiyagarajan booked some space in the local community centre and the first session sold out pretty much instantly. The sessions grew, as did participation, and in 2015 he quit his job in IT to run Zebra full time. Zebra Robotics now has four locations in Canada and two in the United States. 

      “Everything is coding. Every field that you look at, be it geology or medicine or engineering—even communications—uses some level of intense computing for their processes. So that skill set is going to be needed going forward.”
      —Satish Thiyagarajan, Zebra Robotics

      How important is coding?

      While the timing of the new curriculum could have been better, given the pandemic (though to be fair, the document was in development for years) many believe that coding should have been introduced much earlier. “Everything is coding,” says Thiyagarajan. “Every field that you look at, be it geology or medicine or engineering—even communications—uses some level of intense computing for their processes. That skill set is going to be needed going forward.” 

      Web interfaces, building apps, working with AI, such as the algorithms behind the apps we use every day—they all require coding skills, and different types of coding skills, as well as design thinking. Coding, increasingly, is a part of everything that we do, from working online, to playing games, to driving our cars. 

      Given that, Thiyagarajan feels that the right thing to do is to give kids the skills they’ll need in order to seize the opportunities available to them. So far, we aren’t. He notes that, in a conservative estimate, there are going to be in excess of a million jobs in North America that will remain unfilled because there simply aren’t enough people with the skills to fill them. And that’s a trend we can expect to continue. “I think we need to start equipping our kids, and I think it’s good that Ontario is recognising that and introducing coding into the curriculum.” 

      It’s important, though he notes that instruction also has to be fun. “Just this morning we had a session at one of the public schools here, and the kids were super excited.” The kids were working together, if remotely, to build a game. “There was a bat that was trying to eat bananas and if you let the banana fall onto the floor of the cave then the bat loses,” he says chuckling. “But it’s simple things like that. For kids it’s fun, but what they are learning is how to code, how to think logically.” 

      Thiyagarajan’s son is now in grade 12 and has been accepted to the computer science program at the University of Toronto, beginning in the fall of this year.  He’s done well, and the company he had a part in inspiring has, too—the program has taught in excess of 12000 participants—a testament to the growing interest in coding, and the need for kids to build the skills associated with it.



    Frequently Asked Questions

    Does Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth have good reviews?
    We've collected reviews from past attendees. Read 4 reviews of Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth here.

    What types of programs does Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth offer?
    Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth runs: year-round programs, virtual programs, day camps. Programming specializes in: Minecraft, STEM, Scratch, Animation, Video Game Design, Robotics, LEGO, Web Development, Web Design, Education (multi). Browse the program calendar for rates and dates.

    What age does Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth start?
    Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth has programs for children aged 6 to 18.

    How much does is cost to attend Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth?
    Fees to attend Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth range from $150 to $495/month.

    Does Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth offer support for children with special needs?
    Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth offers some mild support for children with special needs. Please contact the director to discuss your needs.

    Does Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth offer busing?
    No, Zebra Robotics - Toronto Danforth does not offer transportation.




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