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THE OUR KIDS REPORT:
The Toronto Heschel School

Grades Preschool TO 8 — Toronto, ON (MAP)

The Toronto Heschel School:
THE OUR KIDS REPORT
REPORT CONTENTS:

Pages in this report:

  • Grades
    Preschool — 8
  • Gender
    Coed
  • Class Size
    16 — 18 students
  • Tuition
    $8,500 to 19,950/year
  • Language of instruction
    English, Hebrew
  • Associations
    ECO,
  • Enrolment
    300 day students
  • Curriculum
    Liberal Arts
  • EBROCHURE
    N/A

School address

  • 819 Sheppard Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario, M3H 2T3 (MAP)
  • Busing available (View details)

School Busing:

Heschel offers bus transferring. Service options offered are regular rider, door-to-door pickup.

The regions Heschel offers busing from are:

  • Toronto

Additional notes: We offer subsidized door-to-door transportation to and from Heschel through a private bussing company. The school facilitates and subsidizes the service, but policy agreements are made between each family and the company. Bus service currently runs between Finch Avenue to the north, Bayview Avenue to the east, St. Clair Avenue to the south, and Dufferin Avenue to the west. The boundaries are subject to change in any given school year based on demand. We are assessing the feasibility of depot bussing for the 2023-2024 school year to provide a more economical bussing option.

Our Perspective

How we see The Toronto Heschel School


The Toronto Heschel School was founded in 1996 in part as an expression of the work and values of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, a leader who championed empathy, justice, and wonder. Among many other things in his life, Heschel participated in the civil rights movement and marched alongside Martin Luther King in Selma, Alabama. He later commented that, “When I marched in Selma, my feet were praying.” It’s that spirit that the Toronto Heschel school continues to embrace today. The community of the school is diverse, with families drawn to the provision of a strong, challenging academic program within the context of social justice and the values of caring and respect for others. When students arrive they enter a community that expresses those values in all aspects of the life of the school, and are inspired to actively participate within them.

School's Perspective

How The Toronto Heschel School sees itself


The school administration answered our questions

Who are you, as a school?

"Heschel provides a progressive Jewish education within a close, caring community. We aim to inspire a sense of awe and wonder in your children, and a lifelong love of learning. Heschel offers an innovative, interdisciplinary curriculum built upon arts-based activities and Jewish culture and literacy. Our welcoming and egalitarian school promotes mutual respect, concern for others, and social justice. Graduates embody the confidence, skills and compassion to be thought leaders and engaged community members."

  • Bilingual Hebrew/English learning environment
  • Curriculum integrates general and Jewish studies with learning through the arts
  • Fostering social-emotional learning and derekh eretz
  • Platinum EcoSchool! Outdoor education on our 6-acre campus includes classrooms and a hands-on garden
  • Multi-denominational Jewish student body
  • Active parent chevra community
  • Before- and after-school care and onsite extra-curricular activities available
  • Subsidized bussing offered
  • Optional hot kosher lunch program
  • Awards include Best Private School by The Toronto Star & NY Mirror ('20+'21); Covenant Award

What do you do differently and uniquely well?

"We take an arts-based, interdisciplinary approach, whereby Jewish content and Hebrew are woven with general studies throughout the school day. Hands-on experiential learning trains students to go beyond rote memorization to test theories and internalize concepts. Our progressive school promotes social responsibility and social-emotional learning, producing confident students who feel accepted and respect diversity. As a Platinum EcoSchool, students also learn to be environmental change-makers."

Why do families choose you over schools they compare you to?

"Families are attracted to Heschel’s warm and inclusive community. We consciously create ethical human beings through social emotional learning and derekh eretz, resulting in a cohort of kind and considerate children. In this milieu, students feel comfortable being themselves.

Our award-winning thematic curriculum fuses general studies and Judaics with the arts and multi-sensory learning, allowing students to boost creativity and build enduring connections. Kids enjoy learning at Heschel!"

What might families find surprising about your school?

"Students build their communication skills through drama, public speaking and concerts, allowing them to feel confident in their own skin and in expressing their opinions. Assignments are built on each other to develop skills that are interlocking, with the bigger picture in mind. This may not be evident midstream but is obvious by Grade 8.

In addition, each class is deemed as important as the next. This enables students to discover new strengths because they are encouraged in each subject."

What aspect of your school is underappreciated?

"At Heschel, we reconceive the role traditional school subjects play in education. Instead of math, language, music or Talmud being “stuff” deposited in our children’s minds, we see these classes as “disciplines”—ways of training our minds. School subjects are viewed not just as a means to convey information, but as vehicles to hone cognitive abilities. In a rapidly changing world, it is unclear what our children will need to know, but we can train them to be smart, mentally agile, and creative."

What five facts about your school tell your story?

"1. We use Harvard’s Teaching for Understanding methodology whereby students acquire deep and lasting knowledge.
2. Kisui head coverings are worn in our pluralistic and egalitarian Jewish community.
3. We've been an Ontario EcoSchool for 16 years, at the Platinum level for the last 7.
4. Hebrew is not an isolated subject. It’s used throughout the school, even in gym class.
5. We have a kiln to fire each grade’s pottery projects. Kids use a wide variety of media to express their creativity."


School Facilities

Photo-tour of facilities


Athletics facilities


Arts facilities


Campus


Classrooms


Science facilities


Instructional resources


Shared spaces


School Videos

Insider Perspectives

How people from the school’s community see The Toronto Heschel School


Video reviews of The Toronto Heschel School

Alum, Jacob Mausberg (2022)

Watch our alum interview with Jacob Mausberg to learn about the unique experience of attending The Toronto Heschel School.

Roundtable Q&A (2021)

Watch our The Toronto Heschel School Q&A discussion with Seth (Parent), Jessica (Parent), Paige (Alum) to gain fresh insight into the school’s culture, values, and strengths.

Parent, Coby Segall (2021)

Watch our parent interview with Coby Segall to get the inside scoop on what it’s like to have a child attend The Toronto Heschel School.

School leadership

Top-down influence on the school’s direction and tone


Message from school leadership

Dr. Greg Beiles, Head of School
B.A., B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.

At Heschel, we are proud to integrate a deep love for Jewish learning with the highest academic standards. Our inclusive pluralistic community invites Jewish families with diverse perspectives to join in a respectful learning community. Our cutting-edge integrated curriculum is based on research and development of best educational practices. We nurture the habits of heart, soul, body and mind that enable children to flourish academically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually.

Our team of passionate, highly qualified teachers see themselves as on-going learners and reflective practitioners. We strive to deepen our understanding of how children learn best so that we can design the optimum learning experiences for each child.

Together with our teachers, our families are our most valued partners in achieving the best education for children. Families play a tremendous role in shaping and upholding the inclusive, nurturing, and positive culture of our school. The values of our parent body provide the context for our educational approach to succeed.

Greg Beiles, Head of School

 

Please click HERE to watch video greetings from Moreh Greg!

Evaluate The Toronto Heschel School for your child

Answer just to supplement this page with our expert insight into the FIT between The Toronto Heschel School and your child (BETA).
1. Select category
1. Select category
  • Sociability
  • Mental focus
  • Physical activity level
  • Academic focus
  • Arts-oriented
  • STEM-oriented
  • Gifted
  • Special needs (general)
  • Learning disabilities
  • Social/emotional issues
  • Learning style
  • Learning preference
  • Anxious
  • ADHD
  • Autistic
  • Dyslexic
2. Select child's dominant trait
How outgoing is your child?

3. See personalized insights
How Extroverted kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Most big schools provide your extroverted child with plenty of social opportunities and the ability to interact with different peer groups with a wide range of personalities, interests, values, etc. A larger student population and more extracurriculars—including activities like team sports, arts programs, and debate—will give them a broader scope of opportunities to participate in events that scratch their interpersonal itch. “This may also give them the opportunity to hone certain skills,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “For instance, they might run for student council to develop leadership and public speaking skills and learn to be a voice for other students.”

How Introverted kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Make sure any prospective school, no matter what size, provides the right social environment to help your child feel at home, make friends, and develop confidence. This is especially important at big schools, which are sometimes more socially overwhelming and challenging for an introvert to find their bearings in. Of course, “Because larger schools usually have a more diverse student population, introverted kids are more likely to find a small group of people like them, a peer group they can relate to and find acceptance from,” says Dona Matthews, Toronto-based education consultant and co-author (with Joanne Foster) of Beyond Intelligence.

    Bigger schools often have a broader scope of extracurricular activities, which is another way to help your child meet the right group of friends. “This may also give them the opportunity to develop certain skills,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “For instance, they might run for student council to develop leadership and public speaking skills and learn to be a voice for other students. Remember, though, each child is different—so what works for one may not work for another.”

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait
How mentally focused is your child?

3. See personalized insights
How Mentally focused kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    If you’re considering a big school for your mentally focused child, look into the size of its classrooms. Many kids, including focused ones, do better in smaller classes, which not all big schools have. Smaller classes often provide ample individualized learning and one-on-one support, which can boost your child’s engagement.

    Also, ensure a school’s teaching approach is suitable for your focused child. “For instance, a school emphasizing group learning over individual learning may or may not play into your child’s strengths,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “You want to make sure the social, emotional, and academic realities of the classroom are a match for your child’s attention skills and personality.”

How Distractible kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    If you’re considering a big school for your distractible child, look into its classroom sizes and teaching and learning approach. Distractible kids often do better in smaller classrooms with plenty of individualized learning and one-on-one support, as this can help them sustain their concentration.

    Also, “Ask what strategies a school has in place to engage and motivate students,” says Stacey Jacobs, Toronto-based education consultant at Clear Path Educational Consulting. “For instance, do they have flexible seating and innovative furniture?”

    Bigger schools tend to have a wider range of extracurriculars to choose from, which can help your child to pursue an interest or develop a passion. And, “Research shows that when students have something to look forward to after school, they’re often better able to focus during the day,” says Janyce Lastman, Toronto-based education consultant at The Tutor Group. “This can really help them renew their energy and recharge their batteries.”

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait
How physically active is your child?

3. See personalized insights
How Very physically active kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Big schools tend to provide an especially wide range of opportunities for your physically active child to use their energy in productive ways, such as individual and team sports, hiking, and nature walks. In most big schools, they’ll also be given plenty of breaks throughout the day for physical and gross motor activities, such as outdoor recess in the playground. Since different kids enjoy different kinds of physical pursuits, find out exactly what activities a school offers, both in class and out.

    Also, ensure a school’s teaching and learning approach is suitable for your active child. “For instance, a school focusing on individual learning instead of group learning may or may not play into your child’s strengths,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “You want to make sure the social, emotional, and academic realities of the classroom are a match for your child’s personality and energy level.”

How Less physically active kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    If your child is looking to get more physically active, they’ll benefit from the wide range of extracurriculars at big schools, such as sports and nature walks. In addition to improving their physical and mental health, these activities can help them broaden their horizons and come out of their shell.

    Just make sure any prospective school, no matter the size, provides the right academic and social environment to help your less active child focus on their work and feel like they belong. This is especially important at big schools, which sometimes have bigger classes (with less one-on-one support) and can be more socially overwhelming. That said, the bigger the school, the more diverse the student body (in terms of personalities, interests, etc.), which can make it easier for your child to find a group of like-minded peers. 

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait
How focused is your child on school and academic achievement?

3. See personalized insights
How Intensively academically-focused kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Many big schools offer high-level courses as well as subject-specific enrichment and acceleration opportunities, which some academically-focused kids find stimulating. Most also have plenty of academic diversity in the classroom, where your child will find many opportunities to challenge themselves in groups with like-minded peers. “Many academically-focused kids enjoy competition in the classroom: they like to measure themselves against peers with high academic aspirations,” says Janyce Lastman, Director of The Tutor Group. “They’re more likely to find this in big schools with big classes.”

    Also, “Due to their large numbers of students, bigger schools offer more opportunities for reflection and collaboration with one’s peers, and to learn from the perspectives of different students, in class and out,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. Having a larger and more diverse pool of students can be a catalyst for intellectual and creative progress (and even breakthrough insights!).

    That said, make sure your child will be able to register for their desired courses in a big school. While big schools often have a wide range of core and specialist courses on their docket, sometimes logistical issues—such as scheduling and timetables—make it challenging for them to run some courses or for your child to enrol in them.

How Less academically-focused kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    If you’re considering a big school for a less academically-focused child, look into its classroom sizes and teaching and learning approach. Smaller classrooms with plenty of individualized learning and one-on-one support can help kids really engage with their school work, regardless of their level of academic interest.

    Bigger schools normally have a wide range of specialist subjects to choose from, which can help your child pursue an interest or develop a new one. Just make sure your child will be able to register for their desired courses in a big school, since sometimes logistical issues—such as scheduling and timetables—make it challenging for these schools to run some courses or for your child to enrol in them.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child passionate about the arts?

3. See personalized insights
How Arts-oriented kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    If you’re considering a big school for your arts-oriented child, make sure it offers them plenty of opportunities to explore their creative impulses. Ideally, it will have some smaller classes with plenty of individualized teaching and learning, since this will give your child more flexibility to pursue their interests and get one-on-one support to refine their skills.

    Since big schools have larger student populations, they often have more arts programs, classes, productions, and staff than smaller schools. They also tend to offer more supplementaries, like after-school musical theatre classes or field trips to art museums.

    Finally, “Due to their large numbers of students, they offer more opportunities for reflection and collaboration with one’s peers, and to learn from the perspectives of different students, in class and out,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “This also allows kids to understand the contributions they can make to the larger student community, such as being a musician in an orchestra, an actor in a play, or a dancer in an ensemble.”

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2. Select if applicable
Is your child passionate about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)?

3. See personalized insights
How STEM-oriented kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since big schools have larger student populations, they often have more STEM programs, classes, and specialty teachers than smaller schools. They also tend to offer more STEM-oriented supplementaries, like after-school robotics classes or field trips to science museums. And, “Due to their large numbers of students, they offer more opportunities for reflection and collaboration with one’s peers, and to learn from the perspectives of different students, in class and out,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. Having a larger and more diverse pool of students can make it easier to produce valuable insights and have creative breakthroughs.

    Ask prospective schools about their class sizes. Smaller classes with plenty of individualized teaching and learning give students more flexibility to pursue their interests in STEM and get one-on-one support to refine their knowledge and skills.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have gifted learning abilities?

3. See personalized insights
How Gifted kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Some big schools provide learning environments that explicitly address the needs of gifted students. These can include dedicated gifted classes, part-time withdrawal classes, enrichment opportunities, acceleration options, and in-class adaptations. Big schools also usually have a wider scope of curriculum options and extracurricular activities that can provide gifted learners with the challenge and stimulation they need across a range of topic areas. Finally, they tend to have more academic diversity in their student bodies, helping your child find like-minded peers as well as opportunities to challenge themselves with other intellectual, curious, and high-ability learners.

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2. Select if applicable
Does your child have special needs?

3. See personalized insights
How Special needs (general) kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with special needs require special attention, ensure any prospective school has small- to medium-sized classes with plenty of structure, individualized learning, one-on-one support, and properly trained special education staff. Also, ask exactly what kinds of special needs support a school provides. For instance, while it's unlikely to provide modifications to the curriculum, does it offer accommodations, and if so, for which special needs?

    Some big schools provide learning environments that explicitly support students with special needs. These can include dedicated special needs classes, integrated classes, and regular classes with in-class adaptations and breakout groups. Many also provide a range of out-of-class resources to promote your child’s academic and social development, such as robust guidance departments, academic and psychological counselling, social work, tutors, and faculty advisors. And some have designated resource/learning centres for students with special needs, as well as various in-house support staff, like speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, and reading specialists.

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2. Select if applicable
Does your child have a learning disability?

3. See personalized insights
How Learning disabilities kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with learning disabilities (LDs) require special attention, ensure any large school has smaller classes (ideally 15 students or less) with plenty of structure, personalized learning, and individual support. Also, look into exactly what kinds of LD support it provides. “While many big schools provide accommodations, such as extra time for tests or assignments, few provide a modified academic curriculum,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting.

    Some big schools provide learning environments that explicitly support students with LDs. These can include dedicated classes, integrated classes, and regular classes with in-class adaptations and breakout groups. Many also offer a range of out-of-class resources to promote your child’s overall development, such as academic and psychological counselling, social workers, tutors, and faculty advisors. 

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have a social, emotional, or behavioural issue?

3. See personalized insights
How Social/emotional issues kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with social issues require special attention, ensure any prospective school has small- to medium-sized classes with plenty of structure, individualized learning, one-on-one support, and properly trained special education staff. Also, ask exactly what kinds of support a school provides both in class and out. For instance, does it provide intensive one-on-one counselling for kids with anxiety?

    “Big schools can be challenging for students who experience anxiety or other emotional and mental health issues,” says Una Malcolm, Director of Bright Light Learners. “Their large student population can contribute to anxiety and worries, and may make it more difficult for teachers to monitor their well-being.”

    Some big schools provide learning environments that explicitly support students with social issues. These can include dedicated classes, integrated classes, and regular classes with in-class adaptations and resource support. Many also provide a wide scope of resources to promote your child’s development, such as educational assistants, resource teachers, counsellors, social workers, and support groups.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait

3. See personalized insights
How Conventional learner kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Big schools vary in the classroom environments they offer. Size isn’t nearly as important as the teaching and learning approach that individual teachers use in meeting the needs of a conventional learner. 

    Here are some things to look for: 

    • A traditional classroom setup (teacher at the front facing the students) 

    • Whole-class lectures 

    • Plenty of structure

    • Graded work and clear criteria for assessment

    Conventional learners tend to do well in learning environments with all or most of these features. However, since learning preferences differ even among these students, ensure a school provides what your child needs.

How Unconventional learner kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    If you’re considering a big school for an unconventional learner, make sure it offers them plenty of independent learning opportunities. Ideally, it will have some smaller classes with lots of individualized teaching and learning, since this will give your child more flexibility to pursue their interests and explore their passions.

    Big schools normally have more extracurriculars for kids to probe different areas of interest, from painting to robotics to creative writing. Also, due to their large numbers of students, they offer more opportunities to find a group of like-minded peers to learn and grow with, in class and out.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait

3. See personalized insights
How Independent learner kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Make sure a big school offers your child plenty of independent learning opportunities. Ideally, it will have some smaller classes with individualized teaching and learning, giving your child more flexibility to pursue their interests and develop their skills. With more classes and student cohorts, big schools can often accommodate a wide range of learning styles, including independent learning. Some also offer greater access to guidance and resources to help students subject choices and independent pursuits.

    Since big schools have larger student populations, they often have more extracurriculars and after-school programs. Whether it’s art, STEM, or coding, your child will have more opportunities to continue their unique learning path outside of class.

    Finally, “If your independent learner is a competitive student who likes to measure themselves against their peers, they’re more likely to find this in a big school,” says Janyce Lastman, Director of The Tutor Group. “Since they have diverse student bodies, it will be easier for your child to find peers with high academic aspirations to compete with.”

How Collaborative learner kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Big schools vary widely in their learning environments and approaches. While some stress collaborative learning and provide lots of group activities, others don’t. That said, with many classes and diverse student cohorts, big schools can often accommodate and nurture a wide range of learning styles, including collaborative learning.

    Since big schools have larger student populations, they often have more extracurriculars and supplementals for students to pursue group learning activities like debate and student government. Also, “Due to their large numbers of students, they offer more opportunities to find a group of like-minded peers, in class and out,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child anxious?

3. See personalized insights
How Anxious kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with anxiety require special attention, ensure any prospective school has small- to medium-sized classes with plenty of structure, individualized learning, one-on-one support, and properly trained special education staff. This is especially true if your child has a diagnosed anxiety disorder.

    “Big schools can be challenging for students with anxiety,” says Una Malcolm, director of Bright Light Learners. “Navigating a large student population and lots of relationships can compound issues with anxiety. And it’s sometimes more difficult for teachers and administrators to monitor students’ well-being in this setting.”

    That said, many big schools provide a wide scope of resources to support anxiety (and other mental health issues), such as educational assistants, resource teachers, psychologists, social workers, and support groups. Ask exactly what kinds of support a school provides, both in class and out. For instance, does it provide counselling for kids with a social anxiety disorder or selective mutism?

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have ADHD?

3. See personalized insights
How ADHD kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with ADHD require special care, ensure any prospective school has smaller classes (ideally 15 students or less) with plenty of structure and one-on-one support to help them stay focused on their studies. Also, ask exactly what kinds of support a school provides both in class and out. For instance, “do you have an in-house psychologist who can help my child with their impulse control?”

    “Big schools can sometimes be challenging for students with ADHD,” says Una Malcolm, director of Bright Light Learners. “Navigating a large student population and lots of relationships can sometimes be a distraction which interferes with the ability to focus in class. And in a big school with bigger classes, it’s sometimes more difficult for teachers to monitor students’ well-being.” 

    The upside is most big schools offer a range of support for children with ADHD (and other special needs), such as educational assistants, resource teachers, psychologists, social workers, and support groups. They also tend to offer many supplemental activities to give your child physical, cognitive, and creative outlets, and to enable them to hyperfocus on areas of interest (which many ADHD kids enjoy).

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child autistic?

3. See personalized insights
How Autistic kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require special attention, ensure prospective schools have smaller classes with plenty of structure and one-on-one support, run by qualified special education staff. Depending on where your child falls on the spectrum, they may need a learning environment with direct support for ASD, such as a dedicated ASD class or a regular class with targeted ASD support. 

    Many big schools offer a wide range of resources to support kids with autism (and other special needs), such as educational assistants, psychologists, and social workers. Ask what’s available, focusing specifically on your child’s needs. For instance, “do you have an in-house psychologist who can help my child with their social skills?”

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child dyslexic?

3. See personalized insights
How Dyslexic kids fit with Heschel's dimensions:
  • Big school (151+ students)

    Since kids with dyslexia require special attention, ensure any large school has smaller classes (ideally 15 students or less) with plenty of structure, personalized learning, and individual support. Also, ask exactly what kinds of resources it has to support your child. For instance, “do you have a reading intervention specialist to help my child work on their phonic decoding?”

    Some big schools provide learning environments that explicitly support students with dyslexia. These can include dedicated classes and regular classes with in-class adaptations and breakout groups. Many also offer a range of out-of-class resources to promote your child’s overall development, such as academic and psychological counselling, social workers, tutors, and faculty advisors.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.

THE OUR KIDS REPORT: The Toronto Heschel School

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