Oak Learners logo

THE OUR KIDS REPORT:
Oak Learners

Grades JK TO Gr. 8 — Etobicoke, ON (MAP)

Oak Learners:
THE OUR KIDS REPORT
REPORT CONTENTS:

Pages in this report:

  • Grades
    JK — Gr. 8
  • Gender
    Coed
  • Class Size
    6 — 8 students
  • Tuition
    $16,900 to 19,250/year
  • Language of instruction
    English
  • Associations
    N/A
  • Enrolment
    60 day students
  • Curriculum
    Progressive & Reggio Emilia
  • EBROCHURE
    View eBrochure

School address

  • 394 Royal York Road, Etobicoke, Ontario, M8Y 2R3 (MAP)
  • 3003B Lakeshore Blvd W, Etobicoke, Ontario, M8V 1K2 (MAP)
  • Busing not available

Our Perspective

How we see Oak Learners


Oak Learners is the very definition of a community-based, student-centered academic environment. Classes are small, personal, and lessons begin with the talents, interests, challenges and curiosities that the children bring with them into the room. An emphasis on the arts is used as entrée to the curriculum, underscoring a cross-curricular approach to instruction. Classroom spaces are bright, open, and adaptable to large group, small group, and tutorial-style learning. Founder Kelly Ferrell is rightly a draw, bringing a wealth of experience to the offering, as well as a proven track record as an educator, leader and entrepreneur. The faculty she’s attracted shares her enthusiasm for active, hands-on, inquiry-based learning. Still relatively young, Oak Learners has quickly established itself as a key offering within its catchment area.   

School's Perspective

Compare with:  

How Oak Learners sees itself


The school administration answered our questions

Who are you, as a school?

"Oak Learners inspires meaningful learning every day. Passionate teachers nurture children’s natural curiosity about their world with hands-on experiences. Students in Kindergarten through Grade Eight participate in an enriched interdisciplinary program, with a focus on Academic skills, the Arts & Outdoor Education. Academic excellence is enhanced with 30-50% of each school day being integrated with immersive outdoor learning, where academic subjects are explored and shared in an authentic way."

  • Reggio Inspired and Inquiry-Based Curriculum
  • Enhanced Art, Music, Dance, & Drama Programming
  • Small Classes for student-centred learning
  • STEAM Enrichment through cross-curricular learning
  • Enrichment and extended curriculum for Gifted Students
  • Outdoor Education integrated curriculum for up to 50% of each day
  • LD Support with targeted skill development
  • Community-focused environment
  • Diverse and Inclusive community

What do you do differently and uniquely well?

"Our unique approach at Oak Learners inspires creativity, fosters academic skill-building and builds confidence in our students every day. Students of all ages are constantly encouraged to interact with the natural environment: to seek and explore experiential learning opportunities and to ask questions about the world around them. Academic excellence is enhanced with 30-50% of each school day being integrated with immersive outdoor learning."

Why do you think families choose you over schools they compare you to?

"At Oak Learners, education does not follow a one-size-fits-all approach. We work as partners with families to ensure each child receives a personalized learning roapmap that supports and enriches their child(ren)'s individual learning style(s). We passionately believe that our small class sizes facilitate an attentive and adaptable learning environment that will continue to nurture our students with meaningful experiences."

What might families find surprising about your school?

"At Oak Learners, we believe every child can be successful when they belong to a supportive educational community and this is exactly what families who choose Oak Learners will discover. There are proven links between children's mental, emotional, physical and spiritual health with time spent outdoors in nature. Students at Oak Learners have gained increased focus, confidence, self-esteem and overall increased happiness and satisfaction with school."

What aspect of your school is underappreciated?

"Every school day is integrated with immersive outdoor learning, where academic subjects are explored and shared in an authentic way. Small classes help facilitate opportunities for our students to get outside every single day, rain or shine, to explore and enrich the academic curriculum in a meaningful way. The result is happier and healthier children, teachers, and families."

What five facts about your school tell your story?

This information is not available.


School Facilities

Photo-tour of facilities


Athletics facilities


Arts facilities


Classrooms


Instructional resources


School Videos

Insider Perspectives

How people from the school’s community see Oak Learners


Video reviews of Oak Learners

Parent, Susannah Lavallee (2022)

Watch our parent interview with Susannah Lavallee to get the inside scoop on what it’s like to have a child attend Oak Learners.

Parent, Jasmine Bush (2020)

Watch our parent interview with Jasmine Bush to get the inside scoop on what it’s like to have a child attend Oak Learners.

Written reviews of Oak Learners

(4.3)

Parent, Tanya Fudyk (2022)

As a neurodivergent learner, my child is met with a flexible learning environment with a much lower ...

(5)

Parent, Jennifer Dumas (2022)

Our son Gabriel absolutely loves going to school every day. When we drop him off, he gives a huge hu...

(5)

Parent, Anna Kaczorowski (2021)

My son absolutely loves to come to Oak Learners. As a parent, it's amazing to see your child wake up...
See all written reviews (7 total)

School leadership

Top-down influence on the school’s direction and tone


Message from school leadership

Kelly Farrell, Director
OCT, B.Ed

On behalf of the entire staff at Oak Learners, I want to welcome you and your family to our school this year. The global Covid-19 pandemic caused adversity and change. However, as a community, we have adapted by working together to support all the learners in our classrooms and, despite these circumstances, we have ensured that all students received the education and support they needed while remaining safe.

The 2022-2023 school year is no different, with a focus on equity, diversity, ingenuity, and inclusion. All the educators at Oak Learners will face the coming challenges and continue to adapt to create a caring and welcoming school environment.

Raising resilient and successful children certainly does take a village! I love working together with parents to support their child’s education; in a true partnership between the school and families. Communication between home and school is paramount to a child’s success and we strive to demonstrate this value on a daily basis.

At Oak Learners, we strive to create an engaging curriculum that is progressive, interdisciplinary, and most importantly student-driven. Not only are we an innovative not-for-profit learning centre, but we are also a team of leaders in the community, working to ensure all students are supported and cared for. I truly believe that every child has the capacity to excel and succeed and love school.

I am proud to welcome you to our 7th school year and look forward to working with the entire school community once again!

~Kelly Farrell

 


Kelly is an OCT certified teacher and has worked in classrooms and alternative learning environments since 1996 and as a certified teacher since 2004, working with students from Kindergarten through Grade 12. Kelly has a passion for empowering students to develop confidence through building on their strengths to support their difficulties, particularly those with learning exceptionalities, including Learning Differences, ASD, social-emotional needs, and anxiety.  Kelly subscribes to the tenants of Montessori, Reggio-Emilia and Constructivist methods of teaching and is always looking for ways to bring these strategies into the 21st Century through technology and environmental education. 

Throughout her teaching career, Kelly has been teaching, leading, and connecting students and staff with a global community of educators leading the way in 21st century personalized learning. In 2014, Kelly was awarded “Project of the Year” at the Water Docs @School Film Festival for her Inquiry-Based Learning project, “Kids Against Road Salt“.  This project has been used to train new teachers on the benefits and processes behind inquiry-based learning. Kelly’s teaching was also featured in Owl Magazine on the “Cool School” page in  2014 for a unique publishing project undertaken by her Grade 7/8 class that year.

Evaluate Oak Learners for your child

Answer just to supplement this page with our expert insight into the FIT between Oak Learners and your child (BETA).
1. Select category
1. Select category
  • Sociability
  • Mental focus
  • Physical activity level
  • Academic focus
  • Arts-oriented
  • STEM-oriented
  • Gifted
  • Special needs (general)
  • Learning disabilities
  • Social/emotional issues
  • Learning style
  • Learning preference
  • Anxious
  • ADHD
  • Autistic
  • Dyslexic
2. Select child's dominant trait
How outgoing is your child?

3. See personalized insights
How Extroverted kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    If you’re considering a small school for your extroverted child, make sure it offers plenty of social opportunities, including the ability to seek out and interact with different peer groups. Since smaller schools have smaller and less diverse student populations than big schools, it can sometimes be more challenging for your child to find a like-minded group of friends—friends with similar interests, values, etc. 

    “It’s important to look at the social makeup of the school,” says Ruth Rumack of Ruth Rumack's Learning Space. "Is there enough variety that your child will have a group that they feel connected with? Because you want to have friends that are like-minded and you want to be in a social situation where you feel honoured and respected. Variety can also be found in extracurriculars, leadership programs, and sports activities, which tend to have kids with a wide range of personalities.”

    Also, make sure a school’s teaching and learning approach is suitable for your social child. “For instance, a school focusing on individual learning instead of group learning may not play into your child’s strengths,” say Ann and Karen Wolff, Toronto-based education consultants at Wolff Educational Services. “You want to make sure the social, emotional, and academic realities of the classroom are a match for your child’s personality.”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Through extensive group work, projects, and activities, Reggio Emilia schools provide the kind of social and collaborative learning environment many extroverts crave. Since it’s believed children learn well through social interaction, they’re given plenty of time to interact, listen to each other, ask and answer questions, and work on their communication skills. This can nurture their curiosity and imagination, improve their social skills, and enable them to form close and fulfilling friendships. While most Reggio Emilia schools also give kids quite a bit of unstructured social time, make sure you ask about this.

How Introverted kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools often have small classrooms and tight-knit communities, which can make it easier for your introverted child to come out of their shell, make friends, and feel like they belong. Since they’re less socially overwhelming, your child should find it easier to navigate their social environment. And since they’re conducive to group work, small classes often have plenty of interaction, which can help your child develop critical interpersonal skills. 

    Of course, small schools normally have a less diverse student population than big schools, which can sometimes make it more challenging to find a group of like-minded peers—peers with similar personalities, interests, values, etc. This makes it especially important to ask a school about its extracurricular programs, which can help your introverted child establish an intimate social circle.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, a blessing for introverted kids (as it is for extroverted kids). The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can enable your child to feel at home, connect with classmates, and overcome their shyness. Given the social and dynamic environment of the Reggio classroom, make sure your child will get enough time on their own, in and out of class, to replenish their energy and psychological resources.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait
How mentally focused is your child?

3. See personalized insights
How Mentally focused kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes often provide more individualized learning and one-and-one support, which can bolster your child’s concentration. The structure and intimacy of smaller classes can help your focused child engage more fully with their studies. Since they’re conducive to group work, small classes also often have plenty of interaction, which can help your child develop critical interpersonal skills.

    Just keep in mind the law of diminishing returns regarding class size. While a class of 12 or 15 students can boost engagement, a class of 4 or 5 can reduce it, since there are too few voices and perspectives to generate much meaningful interaction and discussion.

    Finally, “Small schools often have a family-like feeling, because the class sizes are so small,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “They form a sense of community across the grades. You get these cross-grade friendships, relationships, and mentoring if it gives certain kids leadership opportunities, something they would rarely have in a larger school.”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, which can be great for highly focused kids (as it can be for less focused kids). The Reggio classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which helps focused kids engage even more fully with their work.

    That said, make sure any Reggio Emilia school provides the right balance of learning opportunities for your child. For instance, if your child prefers individual to group learning, make sure it provides plenty of opportunities for them to work on their own.

How Distractible kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classrooms often provide more personalized attention and one-and-one support, which often helps distractible kids engage with their studies and sustain their focus. Since they’re conducive to group work, they tend to be more interactive, which your child may find invigorating.

    Just keep in mind the law of diminishing returns regarding class size. While a class of 12 or 15 students can boost engagement, a class of 4 or 5 can reduce it, since there are too few voices and perspectives to generate much meaningful interaction and discussion.

    The intimacy of smaller schools and classes can also help your child connect with the student community. “Small schools often have a family-like feeling, because the class sizes are so small,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “They form a sense of community across the grades, with cross-grade friendships, relationships, and often, leadership opportunities.”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, which can often help distractible kids stay engaged in class. The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help your child feel invigorated, focus on their work, and be more productive.

    Just make sure any Reggio Emilia school isn’t too stimulating: know your child and how much stimulation they can handle. And more generally, make sure the school provides the right overall environment for your distractible child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from plenty of individualized learning and one-on-one support, ensure this is provided.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait
How physically active is your child?

3. See personalized insights
How Very physically active kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    If you’re considering a small school for your physically active child, ensure it offers plenty of unstructured social time, such as outdoor recess, during which they can let loose. Since some small schools have fewer supplementals, you should also ask about after-school activities like sports and dance, which can give your child more opportunities to channel their energy in useful ways. Since different kids enjoy different physical activities, ask school staff what’s available, what your child is eligible for, and how they can get involved.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Through extensive group work, projects, and activities, Reggio Emilia schools provide the kind of social and dynamic environment many physically active kids thrive in. Since Reggio educators believe children learn well through social interaction, they’re given plenty of time to interact, play, and explore their environment together.

    Some Reggio Emilia schools also have a nature focus, which can enable your active child to get outdoors, learn about their surroundings, and take part in activities like gardening. Note: since Reggio schools aren’t based on a strict and unified set of principles, be sure to ask any prospective school about its focus on nature, the outdoors, and physical activity in general.

How Less physically active kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    If your child is looking to get more physically active, make sure a small school offers plenty of opportunities to do this. This makes it especially important to ask about a school’s extracurriculars—such as team sports—which can improve your child's physical fitness and enable them to broaden their horizons.

    Smaller schools often have small and intimate classrooms, where your less active child can work independently and in small groups, allowing them to focus on academics in a peaceful, structured, and supportive environment. With tight-knit, less intimidating communities, small schools can also help your child come out of their shell.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    If your child is looking to get more physically active, most Reggio Emilia schools offer plenty of opportunities to do this. They tend to offer plenty of unstructured social time as well as exploratory field trips and activities (e.g., in nature).

    In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, a blessing for less active kids (as it is for more active kids). The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help your child feel at home, connect with classmates, and develop important social skills.

    Given the social and dynamic environment of the Reggio classroom, just make sure your child will get enough time on their own, in and outside of class, to replenish their energy and psychological resources.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait
How focused is your child on school and academic achievement?

3. See personalized insights
How Intensively academically-focused kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    If you’re considering a small school for your academically-focused child, ensure it offers enough enrichment and acceleration opportunities to challenge them. Make sure it also has plenty of academic diversity in the classroom, where your child can work with, be challenged by, and even measure themself against other academically-focused kids.

    Of course, “Smaller schools give kids opportunities to be the ‘big fish in a small pond,’ where their successes and abilities are truly highlighted,” says Una Malcolm, Director of Bright Light Learners. “Some kids enjoy this, and this can be a valuable opportunity to develop their confidence and self-esteem.”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    The Reggio Emilia classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which many academically-focused kids find engaging. Also, “Since it has an individualized approach to learning, a Reggio school will ensure your child can pursue areas of interest and acquire important skills and knowledge,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Education.

    If, however, your academically-focused child prefers individual to group learning, ensure the school provides plenty of opportunities for them to work on their own. And more generally, make sure the school offers the right overall learning environment for your child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from enrichment and acceleration opportunities, confirm these are provided.

How Less academically-focused kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classrooms often provide more personalized attention and one-and-one support, which often helps less academically-focused kids engage with their work more fully. Since they’re conducive to group work, these classes tend to be more interactive and stimulating.

    Just make sure a school provides your child with plenty of opportunities to pursue their passions outside of class—something not all small schools offer. “Research shows that when students have something to look forward to after school, they’re often more motivated and focused during the day,” says Janyce Lastman, Director of The Tutor Group. “This can really help them renew their energy and recharge their batteries.”

    Also, keep in mind the law of diminishing returns regarding class size. While a class of 12 or 15 students can boost engagement, a class of 4 or 5 can reduce it, since there are too few voices and perspectives to generate much meaningful interaction and discussion.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship with one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, which can help many kids engage with the curriculum, including less academically-focused ones. The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help your child feel invigorated, focus on their work, and develop a love of learning

    Just make sure any Reggio school isn’t too stimulating: know your child and how much stimulation they can handle. And more generally, make sure the school provides the right overall learning environment for your less academically-focused child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from plenty of individualized learning and one-on-one support, ensure this is provided.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child passionate about the arts?

3. See personalized insights
How Arts-oriented kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Small schools often have smaller classes with plenty of individualized learning and support, which can give your arts-oriented child the freedom to pursue their creative passions with close supervision and guidance. A smaller student community often means more group work and collaboration, which can enhance learning and enliven the creative process. Smaller schools, especially arts-focused ones, are also more likely to integrate the arts into the general curriculum, something many, though not all, artsy kids enjoy.

    Small schools tend to have fewer arts programs, classes, and extracurriculars than bigger schools. Ask what’s available, focusing specifically on your child’s areas of interest and need. For instance, if they’re keen to work on their sculpting skills, find out whether a class is offered during or after school, and whether your child is eligible for it.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools have an individualized approach to learning, which will give your child the freedom to pursue their interest in the arts and explore their creative passions. These schools also tend to integrate art and creativity throughout the curriculum via their focus on the expressive arts. “Reggio Emilia schools strongly encourage students to express themselves and their ideas through a wide variety of media,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. “This is how they learn to communicate their understanding of the world around them.”

    Since different Reggio Emilia schools operate according to different teaching and learning principles, inquire about a school’s approach to arts education. For instance, ask if they have an experience-based approach to teaching art (and if so, what this looks like), whether they offer any direct instruction in the arts, and how, if at all, they integrate the arts with the rest of the curriculum.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child passionate about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)?

3. See personalized insights
How STEM-oriented kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Small schools tend to have fewer STEM programs, classes, and extracurriculars than bigger schools. Ask what’s available, focusing specifically on your child’s areas of interest and need. For instance, if they’re keen to work on their computer programming skills, find out whether a coding class is offered during or after school, and whether your child is eligible for it. Also, ask how they teach problem-solving, instill creativity and innovation, and use technology.

    Of course, since small schools often have smaller classes with plenty of individualized learning and support, they can give your child the freedom to pursue their interest in STEM with close supervision. A smaller student community often means more group work and collaboration, which can enhance learning and stimulate intellectual and creative insights. Smaller schools are also more likely to integrate STEM learning into the general curriculum, something many STEM-oriented kids enjoy.

    Just keep in mind the law of diminishing returns regarding class size. While a class of 12 or 15 students can boost engagement, a class of 4 or 5 can reduce it, since there are too few voices and perspectives to generate much meaningful interaction and discussion.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools’ individualized learning approach gives students a lot of flexibility to explore their interests in different subjects such as STEM. Their approach to teaching science, math, and other STEM subjects is inquiry-based and involves lots of hands-on learning and exploration, which many kids find engaging.

    That said, the experiential approach to STEM learning doesn’t work for all kids. Some kids may prefer more direct instruction and theoretical analysis in STEM than some Reggio Emilia schools provide. Since Reggio Emilia schools vary in their approach, talk to school directors and staff to gauge whether your child is a good fit.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have gifted learning abilities?

3. See personalized insights
How Gifted kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Small schools are sometimes more flexible in meeting gifted learning needs. Make sure a school is willing and able to provide the right learning environment to directly address your child’s learning needs, whether it’s through a segregated gifted class, a part-time withdrawal class, or in-class adaptations such as acceleration or enrichment opportunities.

    If your child enjoys learning and competing with other high-ability learners, confirm this opportunity is available. Also, find out whether a school has extracurricular programs your child will find challenging and stimulating.

    Finally, “Smaller schools give kids opportunities to be the ‘big fish in a small pond,’ where their successes and abilities are truly highlighted,” says Una Malcolm, Director of Bright Light Learners. “Some kids enjoy this, and this can be a valuable opportunity to develop their confidence and self-esteem.”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools’ individualized learning approach enables gifted students to move ahead in the curriculum or pursue more in-depth studies, to keep them challenged and engaged. Also, their classrooms are set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which some gifted learners find academically and socially stimulating.

    If, however, your academically-gifted child prefers individual to group learning, ensure the school provides opportunities for independent activities and pursuits. And more generally, make sure the school offers the right overall learning environment for your child, e.g., whether that’s experiential or more traditionally academic.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have special needs?

3. See personalized insights
How Special needs (general) kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes normally provide lots of individualized teaching and learning and one-on-one support, giving them the flexibility to accommodate students with a wide range of special needs. Some also provide learning environments that directly address special learning needs, such as segregated classes, part-time withdrawal classes, and integrated classes.

    However, “Keep in mind that some small schools only provide support for one special need,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “Ask which special need(s) a school supports, how it supports it, and whether it has teaching staff with the right training and expertise to provide this support.”

    Finally, since small schools tend to have fewer resources, ensure they have whatever’s needed to foster your child’s academic, social, and emotional development, such as guidance departments, academic and social counsellors, educational assistants, and assistive technologies.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools’ special focus on personalized learning and support can be a blessing for kids with special needs. Instead of a one-size-fits-all curriculum, these schools help guide kids through the curriculum according to their own abilities, tailoring it to their strengths, weaknesses, and interests. This makes it less likely your child will fall behind or get lost in the shuffle.

    Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on group and experiential learning is the right fit for your child. Some kids may require more direct instruction and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have a learning disability?

3. See personalized insights
How Learning disabilities kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes normally provide lots of personalized learning and one-on-one teaching. This gives them the flexibility to support students with a wide range of learning disabilities (LDs), and to actively monitor their progress and development. Some also provide learning environments that directly support LDs, such as segregated classes, part-time withdrawal classes, and integrated classes. 

    However, “Keep in mind that some small schools only provide support for one type of learning disability,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “For instance, they may only support dyslexia or language-based learning disabilities." Ask which learning disability (or disabilities) a school supports, how exactly it supports it.” Finally, make sure a smaller school has out-of-class resources to support your child’s development. For instance, if they struggle with decoding language, ensure they have a reading intervention specialist on staff. 

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on personalized learning can be a blessing for kids with learning disabilities (LDs). Since they don’t have a standardized curriculum, these schools help guide kids through their studies according to their own abilities and interests. This makes it less likely they’ll lose track, get lost in the shuffle, or become frustrated. 

    Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ focus on experiential and open-ended learning works for your child. Some kids with LDs may require more direct instruction and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide. For instance, if handwriting and spelling are areas of challenge, ensure they’ll have ample time and support to work on these skills.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have a social, emotional, or behavioural issue?

3. See personalized insights
How Social/emotional issues kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes normally provide lots of individualized learning and one-on-one support, giving them the flexibility to accommodate students with a range of social issues. Some also offer learning environments that directly address these kinds of special needs, such as segregated classes, part-time withdrawal classes, and breakout support groups. 

    “Students with behaviour/emotional/social issues often thrive in smaller school settings,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “These students often feel a sense of comfort and ease in knowing that all of the staff know them and understand their challenges. They can be supported in a trusting environment and have to navigate fewer social relationships, both with their peers and adults.”

    However, keep in mind that some small schools only provide support for one or two social or emotional issues, such as clinical anxiety or depression. Ask which issues a school supports, how it supports them, and whether it has teaching staff with specialized training to provide this support. Finally, since small schools tend to have fewer resources, make sure they have whatever your child needs, such as an on-site psychologist to help them with their impulse control, if this is an issue.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    The warm, community feel of the Reggio Emilia classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can enable kids with social issues to feel at home, connect with classmates, and make close friends. Many kids will also find Reggio’s individualized learning approach and co-constructed curriculum engaging since it enables them to select activities and tasks of interest. 

    Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on group learning is the right fit for your child. Also, some kids may require more structure and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide, such as those with severe emotional or behavioural issues like oppositional defiance disorder (ODD).

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait

3. See personalized insights
How Conventional learner kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Some small schools, especially alternative ones, have smaller classes with a student-centred curriculum and an individualized approach to learning. While this benefits many kids, conventional learners often prefer a more traditional environment, with pre-planned units, teachers who deliver whole-class lectures, and lots of structure.

    That said, many schools with smaller classes, especially those which offer individualized learning, have the flexibility to accommodate a wide range of learning styles. For instance, if your child prefers direct instruction, textbook-based learning, and graded work—as many conventional learners do—a small school may be able to offer these things.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools’ decentralized, collaborative learning environment is often a nice fit for unconventional learners. Conventional learners, however, tend to prefer more teacher-led instruction, textbook learning, and structure than some Reggio Emilia schools provide. However, since different Reggio Emilia schools operate according to different principles, ask a school about its teaching and learning approach to assess your child’s fit.

    Keep in mind, the Reggio Emilia classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which helps students engage more fully with their work. This tends to be a plus for all kinds of learners, including conventional ones.

How Unconventional learner kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Small schools tend to have smaller classes with plenty of individualized learning and independent and small group work. This can enable your unconventional learner to pursue their interests in an engaging and sometimes collaborative environment. It’s also often easier for smaller schools to set up classes of special interest for certain students—such as art history or microbiology—allowing them to pursue unique learning paths.

    Small schools normally have fewer extracurriculars for kids to explore passions and develop skills outside of class. Ask what’s available, focusing specifically on your child’s areas of interest.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools have an individualized approach to learning, which will give your child the flexibility to explore areas of special interest. Also, “Reggio Emilia schools tend to celebrate unconventional learning and thinking,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. “They tend to really emphasize creative expression—they strongly encourage students to express themselves and their ideas through a wide variety of media.” Finally, the Reggio Emilia classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which many unconventional learners (and conventional learners) find stimulating. 

    That said, if your child prefers individual to group learning, ensure a school provides plenty of opportunities for them to work on their own. And more generally, make sure it offers the right overall learning environment for your child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from math enrichment, confirm this is provided.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select child's dominant trait

3. See personalized insights
How Independent learner kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Small schools often have smaller classes with plenty of individualized learning, which can give independent learners the freedom to pursue their interests and explore their passions. It’s also often easier for smaller schools to set up classes of special interest, such as evolutionary biology or musical theory.

    Small schools tend to have fewer extracurriculars and supplemental learning options than bigger schools. Ask what’s available, focusing specifically on your child’s areas of interest. For instance, if they’re eager to work on their painting skills, find out whether an after school or lunch program is offered and whether your child is eligible for it.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools have a child-focused, individualized learning approach, which gives kids the freedom to pursue activities and tasks of interest. Also, “These schools strongly encourage students to express themselves and their ideas through a wide variety of media,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. This is a great way to cultivate independent thinking and learning.

    Since Reggio Emilia schools also prioritize group learning, ensure a school provides enough time for your child to work on their own. And more generally, make sure it offers them the right overall learning environment: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from science enrichment opportunities, confirm these are provided.

How Collaborative learner kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Small schools with smaller classes offer more opportunities for the kind of group work collaborative learners enjoy. Whether it’s discussion groups, project work, or peer-to-peer teaching, they tend to offer plenty of group activities in an inclusive environment.

    Also, “Small schools often have a family-like feeling, because the class sizes are so small,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. “They form a sense of community across the grades. You get these cross-grade friendships, relationships, and mentoring if it gives certain kids leadership opportunities, something they would rarely have in a larger school.”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools enable kids to work alongside their classmates in a variety of contexts. Collaborative learning is a major focus: kids often work in groups on tasks, assignments, and projects, and aim to explore issues and solve problems with their peers.

    In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider children’s relationships to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them—a blessing for collaborative learners (as it can be for other types of learners). Classrooms are set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which can help your child engage fully with their work and develop key social skills.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child anxious?

3. See personalized insights
How Anxious kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Many small schools have smaller classes with lots of one-on-one support and close supervision to support kids with anxiety (and other emotional issues). 

    “Students with anxiety often thrive in smaller school settings,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “These students often feel a sense of comfort and ease in knowing that all of the staff know them and understand their challenges. They can be supported in a trusting environment, and they won’t have to navigate as many social relationships with kids and adults.”

    However, some small schools don’t support kids with certain anxiety disorders, especially severe ones. Ask what kinds of anxiety issues a school supports and how it delivers this support. Finally, make sure your child has access to resources they may need in class or out, such as on-site counselling.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    The warm, community feel of the Reggio Emilia classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can enable kids with anxiety to feel at home. It can help them connect with classmates, make close friends, and pursue engaging independent and group projects.

    Just make sure the Reggio Emilia focus on group learning is the right fit for your child. Also, some anxious kids may require more structure and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide, especially kids with diagnosed anxiety disorders. Ask what support is available and how it’s delivered to gauge whether a school is likely to meet your child’s needs.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Does your child have ADHD?

3. See personalized insights
How ADHD kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes normally provide lots of individualized learning, structure, and one-on-one support, which students with ADHD tend to require. Some also offer learning environments (and special education staff) that directly support ADHD, such as segregated classes, part-time withdrawal classes, and breakout groups. 

    “Students with ADHD often thrive in smaller school settings,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “These students may feel a sense of comfort and ease in knowing that all of the staff know them and understand their challenges. They can be supported in a trusting environment, and they won’t have to navigate as many social relationships with their peers and adults.”

    However, keep in mind that some small schools don’t have the resources to accommodate kids with ADHD, especially if it’s severe. Ask what kind of support is available, both in class and out, and how it will be delivered. For instance, “do you have an in-house psychologist to work with my child on their focus and organization?”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    “Being an active participant, rather than a passive recipient, in learning, as emphasized by Reggio Emilia programs, tends to benefit kids with ADHD,” says Stacey Jacobs, director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. “Engaging in hands-on learning and being encouraged to explore and develop creative thinking is another plus.”

    Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on group learning is the right fit for your child. Also, some kids with ADHD, especially if it’s severe, may require more structure and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide. Speak to school directors and staff to get a sense of whether your child’s needs are likely to be met.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child autistic?

3. See personalized insights
How Autistic kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes normally provide lots of individualized learning, structure, and one-on-one support, which students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often need. Some also offer learning environments (and special education staff) that directly support autism, such as dedicated classes, part-time withdrawal classes, and classes with breakout groups. 

    “Students with autism tend to do well in smaller school settings,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “These students may feel a sense of comfort and ease in knowing that all of the staff know them and understand their challenges. They can be supported in a trusting environment, and they won’t have to navigate as many social relationships with their peers and adults.”

    However, keep in mind that some small schools won’t be able to accommodate kids with autism, especially if a child is on the higher end of the spectrum. Ask what kind of support is available, both in class and out, and how it will be delivered. For instance, “do you have an in-house psychologist to work with my child on their communication and interaction skills?”

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Some kids with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), especially those on the higher end of the spectrum, may require more structure and one-on-one support than some Reggio Emilia schools provide. Also, ensure these schools’ emphasis on group learning is the right fit for your child, as some kids with ASD prefer to work more independently. Speak to school directors and staff to get a sense of whether your child’s needs are likely to be met.

    That said, the warm, community feel of the Reggio Emilia classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help kids with autism connect with classmates, make close friends, and pursue engaging activities and projects. This is especially true if they’re on the lower end of the spectrum.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.
2. Select if applicable
Is your child dyslexic?

3. See personalized insights
How Dyslexic kids fit with Oak Learners's dimensions:
  • Small school (150 students or less)

    Smaller schools with small classes normally provide lots of personalized learning and one-on-one guidance. This gives them the flexibility to support students with a range of learning disabilities (LDs), including dyslexia, and to actively monitor their progress and development. Some also provide learning environments that directly support dyslexia, such as segregated classes and part-time withdrawal classes. 

    “Keep in mind, though, that not all small schools provide support for kids with dyslexia,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. “For instance, a school may only support kids with LDs involving math or numbers (like dysgraphia).” 

    Ask whether a school supports dyslexia, and if it does, how it delivers this support. Finally, make sure a smaller school has out-of-class resources that meet your child’s needs. Since your child struggles with decoding language, they may need regular visits with an on-site reading intervention specialist.

  • Reggio Emilia school

    Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on personalized learning can be a blessing for kids with dyslexia. Since they don’t have a one-size-fits-all curriculum, these schools help guide kids through their studies according to their own abilities and interests. This makes it less likely they’ll fall off track, get lost in the shuffle, or become frustrated. 

    Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ focus on group and open-ended learning works for your child. Some kids with dyslexia may require more structure, direct instruction, and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide. For instance, to help them with their phonic decoding, your child may require a reading specialist, which most Reggio Emilia schools won’t have on staff.

Select a trait in Step 2 to receive child-customized insights about this school. Create a child profile to save your child trait selection.

THE OUR KIDS REPORT: Oak Learners

Next steps to continue your research:

 Add to shortlist
Oak Learners logo
Oak Learners:
The Our Kids Report

TOP

Continue researching Oak Learners with OurKids.net, or visit school website.


Thank you for using Our Kids. The Trusted Source for Families since 1998.  
x

By logging in or creating an account, you agree to Our Kids' Terms and Conditions. Information presented on this page may be paid advertising provided by the advertisers [schools/camps/programs] and is not warranted or guaranteed by OurKids.net or its associated websites. By using this website, creating or logging into an Our Kids account, you agree to Our Kids' Terms and Conditions. Please also see our Privacy Policy. Our Kids ™ © 2023 All right reserved.