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Selwyn House School
Selwyn House School
95, chemin Côte St. Antoine
Westmount, Quebec, H3Y 2H8
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Contact name:
Nathalie Gervais

Phone number:
(514) 931-2775×
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Selwyn House School
 

Selwyn House School

95, chemin Côte St. Antoine, Westmount, Quebec, H3Y 2H8

School Type:
Academic
Grades (Gender):
K to 11 (Boys)
Tuition:
$16,690 to $21,810 per year
Main Language:
English
Avg. Class Size:
15 to 20
Enrolment:
Day: 540 (Gr. K-11)

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Contact Name:
Nathalie Gervais

Phone Number:


School Address
95, chemin Côte St. Antoine, Westmount, Quebec, H3Y 2H8

About this school:
highlights

Selwyn House School is a CEGEP/university-preparatory school for boys, combining academic excellence, a dedication to French language and culture, and a compassionate and supportive environment enabling boys to live a happy, balanced and purposeful life. Visit our Open House on Tuesday, September 30, from 5:00 to 8:00 pm (presentation at 6:00 pm), and Kindergarten Open House on Thursday, November 6, from 8:30 to 11:00 am (information session at 8:30 am).

More information on Selwyn House School
Selwyn House School is an academic, day school in Westmount, Quebec. The school offers programs for grades K to 11 with enrolment of 540 students. Selwyn House School has an average class size of 15 to 20 students and has a tuition of $16,690 to $21,810 per year. Founded in 1901, this private school requires students to wear uniforms and the language of instruction is English.


Principal's Message expand

principal

Hal Hannaford, Headmaster

At Selwyn House our objective is to prepare boys to lead balanced and productive personal and professional lives. We know boys. Their potential, energy, dedication and passion are all celebrated; at Selwyn House we take advantage of being able to focus on best practice for boys.

Nous offrons un programme de formation générale à la fois chargé, sans toutefois être rigide, stimulant et approprié, tout en faisant parallèlement preuve d’une grande souplesse. Nous tentons de constamment maintenir un équilibre entre les études, l’athlétisme, les arts, la croissance sociale, et le développement spirituel et affectif. Dans notre milieu biculturel, nous nous efforçons aussi de viser la billitératie.

The culture is one of excellence in all areas and this ideal is clearly demonstrated each and every day by our wonderful faculty. I marvel at their passion and their dedication. They are true professionals and together with our students and their parents, they forge strong relationships – relationships we refer to as the triangle of commitments.

In 2008, Selwyn House celebrated its 100-year anniversary, proud to be at the forefront of education in Canada and equally excited about our future. A Selwyn House graduate is a young man who cares. He is prepared academically, he is a life-long learner, and he has developed a true sense of self-awareness.

Nous croyons que nous pouvons amener votre fils à relever les défis du 21e siècle et à apporter une contribution importante et précieuse à la société.

I encourage you to visit our school and to discover for yourself the unique qualities of the Selwyn House experience. It remains impressive.


Admission expand

admission

Application Requirement:

Application deadlines: Kindergarten to Grade 4 - November 21, Grades 5 to 11 - October 10.

To receive an admission package please contact:

Nathalie Gervais
Send Email

School Entry Points:

  • Entry Points (Day): Students Admitted
    K Limited
    1 Limited
    2 Limited
    3 Limited
    4 Limited
    5 Limited
    6 Limited
    7 Limited
    8 Limited
    9 Limited
    10 Limited
    11 Limited

Tuition & Financial Aidexpand

highlights

Tuition:

Type Tuition
Day Students $16,690 to 21,810 CDN

Payment Options:

Deposit required with acceptance Yes
Maximum installments available 2

Scholarships & awards:

  • Bursary
       Amount: 100%
       Type: Need based
       Grade(s): 7 to 11

Stories & Testimonials expand

News

Selwyn House librarian features on Canada Writesexpand

Selwyn House Assistant Librarian and published poet Carol-Ann Hoyte is one of two writers featured in the CBC Canada Writes series for December 17 on CBC.ca.

This year Canada Writes focuses on children's literature. And the Crowd Went Wild, Carol-Ann recently published anthology of children's poetry related to sports won a bronze medal in the 2012 Moonbeam Children's Book Awards and was also nominated for the 2012 Cybils (Children'€™s and Young Adult Bloggers'€™ Literary Awards) in the United States.

...



Students printing in three dimensionsexpand

Selwyn House students are among a select few who already have their hands on technology that may soon radically change the world as we know it.

Students in Bill Bedard's Computer Art students are designing and building a chess set using the school'€s new 3-D printer. They design each chess piece using a form of computer-aided design (CAD) software, which has been in use by engineers and architects for years. But when it comes time to actually build the chess piece, the school's new 3-D printer can now do it automatically right in front of their eyes.

It is called a printer because it uses technology similar to that used by computers to print onto a sheet of paper. But the 3-D printer actually builds three-dimensional objects out of molten material (in this case, extruded plastic) following the detailed specifications of the student’s three-dimensional CAD design.

Whereas traditional machining uses a subtractive approach, cutting or drilling to achieve a design by removing material, 3-D printing uses an additive process, building the object from the ground up. Starting at the base of the design, the printer builds an object in layers, like a cake decorator squirting icing, or a miniature bricklayer building a tiny house. Virtually any small object can be built by this method. More sophisticated printers can build larger objects from a variety of materials.

The idea of acquiring the printer came from retired science teacher Brad Moffat. The science department seized upon the idea and bought one for less than $5,000. Mr. Bedard'€™s class project is one of the first to utilize the machine for a class assignment.

Fittingly, the students were assigned the task of designing chess pieces for a 3-D chess game devised by Mr. Moffat. Unlike regular chess pieces, no one knows what the pieces for a 3-D chess game should look like. The students had to design and build pieces entirely from their own imagination. "€œGrade 11 students like to really push the limits of design and see what they'€™re capable of doing with the software,"€ says Mr. Bedard.

The implications of 3-D printing for the future are huge. Traditional manufacturing methods can achieve an economy of scale by creating many identical copies cheaply from a single design. But this new approach allows for more variety, complexity and flexibility. A simple adjustment to the program can quickly correct a flaw or retool a design.

And it puts the tooling and manufacturing right on one’s desktop. "€œNow when something breaks, you print up a replacement piece,"€ says Mr. Bedard.

These machines have been around since the 1980s, but are becoming more refined and affordable as their potential becomes apparent. They are already being used by architects, dentists, aerospace engineers, and many others. The future of 3-D printing, however, is limited only by our imagination.

This technology is being viewed as a having future applications not only in fields such as archaeology and forensic sciences, but also in medicine, where it might be used to build artificial joints or replacement organs - €”even synthesized food - €”from basic organic material.

Three-D printing could also drastically alter the global economic structure, as centralized manufacturing is replaced by do-it-yourself production of precision-built components of all kinds. It will be a different world when anything can be made anywhere.

As early as 2007, The Wall Street Journal and Time magazine were identifying the 3-D printer as one of the most influential design innovations of our time. A February 2011 article in The Economist said: "€œJust as nobody could have predicted the impact of the steam engine in 1750 - or the printing press in 1450, or the transistor in 1950 - it is impossible to foresee the long-term impact of 3-D printing. But the technology is coming, and it is likely to disrupt every field it touches."

The October 2012 issue of Wired magazine has a cover story entitled "This Machine will Change the World." This technology, it says, " ... will allow you to turn CAD files into physical things as easily as printing a photo."€ The technology is really starting to take off now that one can purchase pre-programmed designs off the Internet, skipping the tedious part and getting right to work building our world from scratch. "€œIf you can think it,"€ says Wired, "€œyou can build it."

To watch a video of the 3-D printer at work, please click on https://www.selwyn.ca/podium/default.aspx?t=159312

...



Moores make wrestling newsexpand

Selwyn House Wrestling Coach Rob Moore has been named to coach the Canadian Team at the 2012 World University Championships in Kourtane, Finland, Oct 1-5.

Rob's son Selwyn House Grade 9 wrestler Alex Moore, was one of 30 top athletes from all sports in the Province of Quebec to receive a $2,000 Hydro Quebec Bursary in Montreal, April 26, in recognition of his gold medal at the 2012 Canadian Cadet Championships. Moore won Provincial and GMAA Gold Medals for the Gryphons as well in the 2011-2012 Season.

...



Gryphons win GMAA Bantam Football bannerexpand

Congratulations to the Bantam Football team and Coaches Matt Connell, Anthony Lukca, and Kevin Boyle on their GMAA championship victory over previously undefeated Kuper Academy at Parc Benevole in Kirkland on October 31.

The Bantam Gryphons were full value for the win. They played solid defence, and, coupled with timely offence, controlled the majority of the play.

The team dominated in the first half, having ball possession about 80 per cent of the time. As usual, Chris Jones ground out yards, while Dhandre Weekes hauled in another impressive TD catch. The defence caused four turnovers; three fumbles recovered, and one interception by Harris Islam.

The Bantams led 13-0 at the half, but things got tense after that. First, Kuper scored a long TD on a reverse. Then, on the ensuing kickoff, they recovered a fumble and took it in for the touchdown, subsequently adding a two-point convert to take the lead 14-13.

The Gryphons, however, did not roll over. Rather, they had a long kickoff return by Jones, then they proceeded to slowly march down the field for the winning touchdown. From there, the hard hitting defense held Kuper at bay.

This victory avenges a regular season 34-0 loss to Kuper.

Congratulations to the Bantam Football team and Coaches Matt Connell, Anthony Lukca, and Kevin Boyle on their GMAA championship victory over previously undefeated Kuper Academy at Parc Benvole in Kirkland on October 31.

The Bantam Gryphons were full value for the win. They played solid defence, and, coupled with timely offence, controlled the majority of the play.

The team dominated in the first half, having ball possession about 80 per cent of the time. As usual, Chris Jones ground out yards, while Dhandre Weekes hauled in another impressive TD catch. The defence caused four turnovers; three fumbles recovered, and one interception by Harris Islam.

The Bantams led 13-0 at the half, but things got tense after that. First, Kuper scored a long TD on a reverse. Then, on the ensuing kickoff, they recovered a fumble and took it in for the touchdown, subsequently adding a two-point convert to take the lead 14-13.

The Gryphons, however, did not roll over. Rather, they had a long kickoff return by Jones, then they proceeded to slowly march down the field for the winning touchdown. From there, the hard hitting defense held Kuper at bay.

This victory avenges a regular season 34-0 loss to Kuper.

...



Tal Pinchevsky’s new book tells dramatic tale of hockey defectorsexpand

Tal Pinchevsky, Class of 1995, returned to Selwyn House on November 12 and 13 to talk to students about his job as a writer for NHL.com, and about his new book, Breakaway: From Behind the Iron Curtain to the NHL - €”the Untold Story of Hockey's Great Escapes.

Tal'€™s book chronicles the events that led the defections of many Eastern European hockey players to North America, as well as the effects of those defections, €”not only on the players themselves, but on the game of hockey. The story is played out on a stage of decades of international feuds, with a plot involving KGB agents, clandestine meetings and car chases.

"It was a very different time," says Tal. "The bad feelings between Czechoslovakia and USSR are hard to imagine today."€ The Soviet crackdown on the "€œPrague Spring"€ uprising of 1968 had fanned the flames of a long-simmering unrest between the USSR and its satellite countries.

As well, the Cold-War rivalry between the Soviets and the west added to the competitive atmosphere. "The best way to show which system was superior was through sports,"€ Tal points out.

As a result, hockey arenas became political arenas, with old scores being settled on the scoreboards.

In North America, demand for new players exploded in 1972 with the establishment of the World Hockey Association and the resulting "war for talent" between the WHA and the NHL. Scouts began casting their eyes toward Eastern Europe.

The first Czech to defect was Vaclav Nedomansky. In 1974 he and his family pretended to be taking a vacation in Switzerland. Instead, they boarded a plane for Toronto, not knowing if they would ever see their friends and family again. Once a big star in his home country, Nedomasky'€™s name was "effectively erased from the history books back home,"€ Pinchevsky says.

The effect was profound, not only in the hockey world, but in the world of geopolitics. "Nedomansky had helped plant the seeds of a new kind of revolution through Eastern Europe,"€ Tal writes. It was a case of "Czechoslovakia and other USSR satellite countries asserting their national will in the face of the Soviet bear."

The defections often tore families apart, as was the case with the Stasny brothers, who were lured to Quebec City to play for the Nordiques in 1968. The two younger ones, Peter and Anton, defected while on tour in Austria, fleeing from men in black for the sanctuary of the Canadian embassy.

But Marian, he oldest, had three children and felt compelled to stay home, where he was kicked off hockey teams and was constantly under government surveillance. "He was ostracized and lost every friend he had," Tal says. "€œHe couldn'€™t play hockey. His kids were barred from university, and his parents couldn'€™t get an apartment."€

If the younger Stasny brothers had returned they would have been thrown in prison.

There are similar stories in the cases of the families of Petr Svoboda and Petr Kilma. Even though the fortunes of most of the defectors improved greatly in North America, they often had difficulty adjusting to the culture and learning English and/or French. Some adapted easily, some not.

Tal says the influx of players from Eastern Europe "transformed the NHL. You can see [their influence] in today's game," he says.

The Europeans were used to larger ice surfaces and they played a "€œfaster, fluid, more finessed game." The Canadian style of play at that time was more physical, relying more on enforcers than is the case today. As result of the flood of European immigrants, the Canadian game has, in Tal'€™s opinion, become more exciting. "Our players are in better shape today [as a result]."

Since moving to New York City in 2001, Tal has written primarily about sports and popular culture for a variety of print and online publications, including The New York Times, ESPN the Magazine, Rolling Stone, the New York Post, Spin, The Source, Men's Fitness, Time Out New York, The Hockey News, and Madison Square Garden'€™s website. He is currently staff writer and producer for NHL.com.

And don't ask him about the lockout.

Breakaway was published by John Wiley and Sons in Canada in September and in the USA in October. It's available at Chapters, through Amazon.com, and is available on Kindle and Sony e-books.

...



Remembering family and friends on Rememberance Dayexpand

The 2012 Remembrance Day ceremony at Selwyn House was not just a service to honour unknown soldiers who died in war to protect our freedoms. It was also a time to remember family members who served in war, and to learn from a recent graduate what life is like for troops in a war zone today.

Lieutenant Chris Robinson, a Selwyn House graduate from the Class of 2000, enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces shortly after high school, in search of adventure. He served two tours of duty overseas, including a 2007 stint as a communications officer in Afghanistan. He returned to Selwyn House for Remembrance Day to describe to students what life is like in modern warfare.

Lt. Robinson served with an Operations Mentoring and Liaison Team, a unit of six Canadian soldiers who serve as advisors to a company of the Afghan forces.

In spite of what we see on television, Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan rarely see combat, and then only when ambushed by the enemy, Lt. Robinson said.

€œ"Ninety per cent of the time nothing happens,€" he said. "The hardest job is for our families back home, because they must live with the unknown."€

Lt. Robinson said he found the Afghan people friendly, and he enjoyed socializing and interacting with them on a basic human level. "Our job is not just to fight,"€ he said. "Our job is also to demonstrate to the locals that there is another way."

But war always has its grave moments. Lt. Robinson recalled a day when he had been talking with a friend in his unit about their plans for what they would to when they returned to Canada. Later that same day, his friend stepped on an explosive device and was killed.

"€œLife just stops,"€ said Lt. Robinson, but a fallen soldier's comrades must press on with their mission.

And so it is with those of us back home who live with the unknown.

For a detailed dairy of Lt Robinson's tour of duty in Afghanistan, please see the summer 2007 issue of Veritas magazine:  https://www.selwyn.ca/ftpimages/242/download/Veritas%20Summer%2007%20Robinson2000.pdf

As part of the program, Grade 11 student Kamil Roy told of a photo album he discovered at his house that had belonged to his great-grandfather, Maurice Forget. The album contained vivid images from Forget'€™s service as a military attaché during the Second World War. Kamil displayed the ceremonial sword once worn by his great-grandfather's ceremonial sword, which is now a family heirloom.

Phil Brock, a graduate from the Class of 2012, returned to the school to tell of his experiences as one of 12 Canadian young people who recently received a Vimy Scholarship to tour the battlefields of France and learn the history of the World Wars fought there. To give meaning to his overseas tour, Phillip followed the history of a Selwyn House graduate who served and died in France.

Senior Social Studies Teacher and Department Head Mark Watson, who organized the Remembrance Day ceremony, also offered a personal story, centering on memories of his late father, who served in the war. In spite of constant urging from him and his siblings, Watson said, his father refused to talk to his children about his war experiences, never relenting until near then end of his life. "He had to live with what he experienced for 60 years before he was released,"€ Mr. Watson recalled.

The Selwyn House Remembrance Day program also included: a reading by Petro Analytis (Grade 8) of "Dulce et Decorum Est"€ by Wilfred Owen, a reading by David Lotey-Goodman (Grade 8) of "€œThe Wind on the Downs"€ by Marian Allen, a reading by Conrad Winton (Grade 8) of "The Cenotaph"€ by Charlotte Mew, a reading of "I Remember,"€ written and read by Massimo Di Silvestro (Grade 7), and Remembrance Day videos by Ben Bedard (Grade 11), Luca D'Angelo (Grade 10) and Jason Small (Grade 11).

In keeping with school tradition, prefects read the names of Selwyn House graduates who died in war.

The Elementary School also held a Remembrance Day ceremony on the afternoon of November 9, featuring a visit from Captain Beaudin of the local Armed Forces Regiment, and a poppy-planting ceremony.

...



Curriculum & Programs expand

Curriculum & Programs

    Specialty Academics

  • AP courses
  • Career planning
  • Community service
  • Duke of Edinburgh's Award
  • Honors
  • Summer camps/program
  • University counseling

    School Support

  • After-school program
  • Transportation

    Special Needs

  • Learning study assistance


    Arts

  • Acting
  • Drawing
  • Electric music
  • Film & video
  • Graphic design
  • Music history
  • Music theory
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Recording
  • Sculpture

    Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Classics
  • Creative writing
  • Debate
  • Literature
  • Philosophy
  • Public speaking
  • World religions

    Languages

  • Chinese-Mandarin
  • English
  • French
  • Spanish

    Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Computers

  • Animation
  • Biology
  • Calculus
  • Chemistry
  • Computer programming
  • Computer science
  • Physics
  • Physiology
  • Robotics
  • Web design


    Academic / Social Clubs

  • Animation
  • Chess Club
  • Community Service
  • Debate Club
  • Poetry/Literature club
  • Robotics club
  • School newspaper
  • Student Council
  • Yearbook

    Arts

  • Band
  • Jazz Ensemble
  • Photography

    Athletics

  • Badminton
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Camping/Canoeing
  • Cricket
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Cycling
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Ice Skating
  • Martial Arts
  • Outdoor Education
  • Rowing
  • Rugby
  • Running
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Weightlifting
  • Wrestling

    Moral Development

  • Leadership
  • Social justice

    Admissions & Finances

  • Bursaries
  • Entrance exams
  • Financial aid
  • Interview required

    Religious Affiliation

  • Non-denominational

Associations expand

  • Canadian Accredited Independent Schools (CAIS) Associations
  • International Boys Schools Coalition (IBSC) Associations
  • The Quebec Association of Independent Schools (QAIS) Associations



Get more info

Contact Name
Nathalie Gervais

Phone Number:


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