ADVERTISEMENT

Welcome to Our Kids.

We’re here to help you find the right school, the right way.

For more than 20 years we’ve worked with leading education and child development experts to explore and improve the school-choice process. The result is a robust suite of tools—used by over 2.6 million families every year—which enable you to choose your best-fit school among the 350+ profiled on this site.

We’re your virtual school-placement consultant: your personal guide to discovering, evaluating, and choosing the right school for your child.

Take 2 minutes now to open your free account. It will give you access to exclusive insights on how specific schools are a fit (or not) for your student’s learning needs.


Open my free account
Welcome to Our Kids

Is a Reggio Emilia school right for your child?

Exploring the potential fit of a Reggio Emilia school for several different types of kids


In finding the right school, you’ll need to look at both the school and your child. Here, we look at the fit of several different child types in Reggio Emilia schools. Note: our aim isn’t to tell you whether a Reggio Emilia school is right or wrong for any type of child, but to highlight some vital child-specific factors you should consider when making your decision.

To learn about how to choose the right school in general, read the Our Kids step-by-step advice guide and questions to ask private schools. To get school-choice advice customized to your child's unique traits, create a child profile through your user account


How several different types of kids fit in Reggio Emilia schools

On this page:

Extroverted

Through extensive group work, projects, and activities, Reggio Emilia schools provide the kind of social and collaborative learning environment many extroverts crave. Since it’s believed children learn well through social interaction, they’re given plenty of time to interact, listen to each other, ask and answer questions, and work on their communication skills. This can nurture their curiosity and imagination, improve their social skills, and enable them to form close and fulfilling friendships. While most Reggio Emilia schools also give kids quite a bit of unstructured social time, make sure you ask about this.

To access our report on the fit of extroverted kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Introverted

In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, a blessing for introverted kids (as it is for extroverted kids). The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can enable your child to feel at home, connect with classmates, and overcome their shyness. Given the social and dynamic environment of the Reggio classroom, make sure your child will get enough time on their own, in and out of class, to replenish their energy and psychological resources.

To access our report on the fit of introverted kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Mentally focused

In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, which can be great for highly focused kids (as it can be for less focused kids). The Reggio classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which helps focused kids engage even more fully with their work.

That said, make sure any Reggio Emilia school provides the right balance of learning opportunities for your child. For instance, if your child prefers individual to group learning, make sure it provides plenty of opportunities for them to work on their own.

To access our report on the fit of mentally focused kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Distractible

In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, which can often help distractible kids stay engaged in class. The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help your child feel invigorated, focus on their work, and be more productive.

Just make sure any Reggio Emilia school isn’t too stimulating: know your child and how much stimulation they can handle. And more generally, make sure the school provides the right overall environment for your distractible child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from plenty of individualized learning and one-on-one support, ensure this is provided.

To access our report on the fit of distractible kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Very physically active

Through extensive group work, projects, and activities, Reggio Emilia schools provide the kind of social and dynamic environment many physically active kids thrive in. Since Reggio educators believe children learn well through social interaction, they’re given plenty of time to interact, play, and explore their environment together.

Some Reggio Emilia schools also have a nature focus, which can enable your active child to get outdoors, learn about their surroundings, and take part in activities like gardening. Note: since Reggio schools aren’t based on a strict and unified set of principles, be sure to ask any prospective school about its focus on nature, the outdoors, and physical activity in general.

To access our report on the fit of very physically active kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Less physically active

If your child is looking to get more physically active, most Reggio Emilia schools offer plenty of opportunities to do this. They tend to offer plenty of unstructured social time as well as exploratory field trips and activities (e.g., in nature).

In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, a blessing for less active kids (as it is for more active kids). The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help your child feel at home, connect with classmates, and develop important social skills.

Given the social and dynamic environment of the Reggio classroom, just make sure your child will get enough time on their own, in and outside of class, to replenish their energy and psychological resources.

To access our report on the fit of less physically active kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Intensively academically-focused

The Reggio Emilia classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which many academically-focused kids find engaging. Also, “Since it has an individualized approach to learning, a Reggio school will ensure your child can pursue areas of interest and acquire important skills and knowledge,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Education.

If, however, your academically-focused child prefers individual to group learning, ensure the school provides plenty of opportunities for them to work on their own. And more generally, make sure the school offers the right overall learning environment for your child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from enrichment and acceleration opportunities, confirm these are provided.

To access our report on the fit of intensively academically-focused kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Less academically-focused

In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider each child’s relationship with one another and aim to promote positive connections between them, which can help many kids engage with the curriculum, including less academically-focused ones. The warm, community feel of the Reggio classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help your child feel invigorated, focus on their work, and develop a love of learning

Just make sure any Reggio school isn’t too stimulating: know your child and how much stimulation they can handle. And more generally, make sure the school provides the right overall learning environment for your less academically-focused child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from plenty of individualized learning and one-on-one support, ensure this is provided.

To access our report on the fit of less academically-focused kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Arts-oriented

Reggio Emilia schools have an individualized approach to learning, which will give your child the freedom to pursue their interest in the arts and explore their creative passions. These schools also tend to integrate art and creativity throughout the curriculum via their focus on the expressive arts. “Reggio Emilia schools strongly encourage students to express themselves and their ideas through a wide variety of media,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. “This is how they learn to communicate their understanding of the world around them.”

Since different Reggio Emilia schools operate according to different teaching and learning principles, inquire about a school’s approach to arts education. For instance, ask if they have an experience-based approach to teaching art (and if so, what this looks like), whether they offer any direct instruction in the arts, and how, if at all, they integrate the arts with the rest of the curriculum.

To access our report on the fit of arts-oriented kids in several different school types, read our guide.


STEM-oriented

Reggio Emilia schools’ individualized learning approach gives students a lot of flexibility to explore their interests in different subjects such as STEM. Their approach to teaching science, math, and other STEM subjects is inquiry-based and involves lots of hands-on learning and exploration, which many kids find engaging.

That said, the experiential approach to STEM learning doesn’t work for all kids. Some kids may prefer more direct instruction and theoretical analysis in STEM than some Reggio Emilia schools provide. Since Reggio Emilia schools vary in their approach, talk to school directors and staff to gauge whether your child is a good fit.

To access our report on the fit of stem-oriented kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Gifted

Reggio Emilia schools’ individualized learning approach enables gifted students to move ahead in the curriculum or pursue more in-depth studies, to keep them challenged and engaged. Also, their classrooms are set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which some gifted learners find academically and socially stimulating.

If, however, your academically-gifted child prefers individual to group learning, ensure the school provides opportunities for independent activities and pursuits. And more generally, make sure the school offers the right overall learning environment for your child, e.g., whether that’s experiential or more traditionally academic.

To access our report on the fit of gifted kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Special needs (general)

Reggio Emilia schools’ special focus on personalized learning and support can be a blessing for kids with special needs. Instead of a one-size-fits-all curriculum, these schools help guide kids through the curriculum according to their own abilities, tailoring it to their strengths, weaknesses, and interests. This makes it less likely your child will fall behind or get lost in the shuffle.

Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on group and experiential learning is the right fit for your child. Some kids may require more direct instruction and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide.

To access our report on the fit of special needs (general) kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Learning disabilities

Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on personalized learning can be a blessing for kids with learning disabilities (LDs). Since they don’t have a standardized curriculum, these schools help guide kids through their studies according to their own abilities and interests. This makes it less likely they’ll lose track, get lost in the shuffle, or become frustrated. 

Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ focus on experiential and open-ended learning works for your child. Some kids with LDs may require more direct instruction and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide. For instance, if handwriting and spelling are areas of challenge, ensure they’ll have ample time and support to work on these skills.

To access our report on the fit of learning disabilities kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Social/emotional issues

The warm, community feel of the Reggio Emilia classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can enable kids with social issues to feel at home, connect with classmates, and make close friends. Many kids will also find Reggio’s individualized learning approach and co-constructed curriculum engaging since it enables them to select activities and tasks of interest. 

Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on group learning is the right fit for your child. Also, some kids may require more structure and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide, such as those with severe emotional or behavioural issues like oppositional defiance disorder (ODD).

To access our report on the fit of social/emotional issues kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Conventional learner

Reggio Emilia schools’ decentralized, collaborative learning environment is often a nice fit for unconventional learners. Conventional learners, however, tend to prefer more teacher-led instruction, textbook learning, and structure than some Reggio Emilia schools provide. However, since different Reggio Emilia schools operate according to different principles, ask a school about its teaching and learning approach to assess your child’s fit.

Keep in mind, the Reggio Emilia classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which helps students engage more fully with their work. This tends to be a plus for all kinds of learners, including conventional ones.

To access our report on the fit of conventional learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Unconventional learner

Reggio Emilia schools have an individualized approach to learning, which will give your child the flexibility to explore areas of special interest. Also, “Reggio Emilia schools tend to celebrate unconventional learning and thinking,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. “They tend to really emphasize creative expression—they strongly encourage students to express themselves and their ideas through a wide variety of media.” Finally, the Reggio Emilia classroom is set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which many unconventional learners (and conventional learners) find stimulating. 

That said, if your child prefers individual to group learning, ensure a school provides plenty of opportunities for them to work on their own. And more generally, make sure it offers the right overall learning environment for your child: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from math enrichment, confirm this is provided.

To access our report on the fit of unconventional learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Independent learner

Reggio Emilia schools have a child-focused, individualized learning approach, which gives kids the freedom to pursue activities and tasks of interest. Also, “These schools strongly encourage students to express themselves and their ideas through a wide variety of media,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. This is a great way to cultivate independent thinking and learning.

Since Reggio Emilia schools also prioritize group learning, ensure a school provides enough time for your child to work on their own. And more generally, make sure it offers them the right overall learning environment: for instance, if they’re likely to benefit from science enrichment opportunities, confirm these are provided.

To access our report on the fit of independent learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Collaborative learner

Reggio Emilia schools enable kids to work alongside their classmates in a variety of contexts. Collaborative learning is a major focus: kids often work in groups on tasks, assignments, and projects, and aim to explore issues and solve problems with their peers.

In Reggio Emilia schools, teachers consider children’s relationships to one another and aim to promote positive connections between them—a blessing for collaborative learners (as it can be for other types of learners). Classrooms are set up to promote lots of interaction and group learning, which can help your child engage fully with their work and develop key social skills.

To access our report on the fit of collaborative learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Anxious

The warm, community feel of the Reggio Emilia classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can enable kids with anxiety to feel at home. It can help them connect with classmates, make close friends, and pursue engaging independent and group projects.

Just make sure the Reggio Emilia focus on group learning is the right fit for your child. Also, some anxious kids may require more structure and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide, especially kids with diagnosed anxiety disorders. Ask what support is available and how it’s delivered to gauge whether a school is likely to meet your child’s needs.

To access our report on the fit of anxious kids in several different school types, read our guide.


ADHD

“Being an active participant, rather than a passive recipient, in learning, as emphasized by Reggio Emilia programs, tends to benefit kids with ADHD,” says Stacey Jacobs, director of Clear Path Educational Consulting. “Engaging in hands-on learning and being encouraged to explore and develop creative thinking is another plus.”

Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on group learning is the right fit for your child. Also, some kids with ADHD, especially if it’s severe, may require more structure and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide. Speak to school directors and staff to get a sense of whether your child’s needs are likely to be met.

To access our report on the fit of adhd kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Autistic

Some kids with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), especially those on the higher end of the spectrum, may require more structure and one-on-one support than some Reggio Emilia schools provide. Also, ensure these schools’ emphasis on group learning is the right fit for your child, as some kids with ASD prefer to work more independently. Speak to school directors and staff to get a sense of whether your child’s needs are likely to be met.

That said, the warm, community feel of the Reggio Emilia classroom—which is set up to promote lots of interaction—can help kids with autism connect with classmates, make close friends, and pursue engaging activities and projects. This is especially true if they’re on the lower end of the spectrum.

To access our report on the fit of autistic kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Dyslexic

Reggio Emilia schools’ emphasis on personalized learning can be a blessing for kids with dyslexia. Since they don’t have a one-size-fits-all curriculum, these schools help guide kids through their studies according to their own abilities and interests. This makes it less likely they’ll fall off track, get lost in the shuffle, or become frustrated. 

Just make sure Reggio Emilia schools’ focus on group and open-ended learning works for your child. Some kids with dyslexia may require more structure, direct instruction, and one-on-one support than some of these schools provide. For instance, to help them with their phonic decoding, your child may require a reading specialist, which most Reggio Emilia schools won’t have on staff.

To access our report on the fit of dyslexic kids in several different school types, read our guide.

Find Private Schools:

In the spotlight:



Sign in for child-specific insights

By creating a child profile through your user account, you'll customize your school search.

You'll receive school-choice advice customized to your child's unique traits, such as their academic focus, learning interests, and social tendencies.

Sign in     Dismiss
Sign in

By logging in or creating an account, you agree to Our Kids' Terms and Conditions. Information presented on this page may be paid advertising provided by the advertisers [schools/camps/programs] and is not warranted or guaranteed by OurKids.net or its associated websites. By using this website, creating or logging into an Our Kids account, you agree to Our Kids' Terms and Conditions. Please also see our Privacy Policy. Our Kids ™ © 2020 All right reserved.

Sign up to receive our exclusive eNews twice a month.

You can withdraw consent by unsubscribing anytime.

Name
Email
verification image, type it in the box
Our Kids From Our Kids, Canada’s trusted source for private schools, camps, and extracurriculars.