ADVERTISEMENT

Welcome to Our Kids.

We’re here to help you find the right school, the right way.

For more than 20 years we’ve worked with leading education and child development experts to explore and improve the school-choice process. The result is a robust suite of tools—used by over 2.6 million families every year—which enable you to choose your best-fit school among the 350+ profiled on this site.

We’re your virtual school-placement consultant: your personal guide to discovering, evaluating, and choosing the right school for your child.

To connect with hundreds of private schools, set up one-on-one meetings with them, and discuss your child’s fit, register for our October 3rd Private School Admissions Pathway.


Register for free access
Welcome to Our Kids

Is a boys' school right for your son?

Exploring the potential fit of an all-boys school for several different types of kids


In finding the right school, you’ll need to look at both the school and your child. Here, we look at the fit of eight different boy types in boys-only schools. Note: our aim isn’t to tell you whether a boy’ school is right or wrong for any type of boy, but to highlight some vital child-specific factors you should consider when making your decision.

To learn about how to choose the right school in general, read the Our Kids step-by-step advice guide and questions to ask private schools. To customize 350+ school profiles with insights unique to your child's traits, create a child profile through your user account


How several different types of boys fit in all-boys schools

On this page:

Extroverted

In a boys-only school, your extroverted son can seek out and interact with different peer groups free from the complexities of boy-girl interactions. He’ll find it easier to focus on finding like-minded friends and pursuing a wide range of social opportunities without the intense pressure and distraction associated with interacting and navigating relationships with the other gender. Of course, he won’t receive quite as broad a scope of social experiences as he would in a coed environment, which can help prepare him for what he’ll encounter outside of school. 

Many boys' schools have a special focus on group and experiential learning, which your outgoing son may find engaging and stimulating. Since schools vary in their pedagogical approaches, ensure you ask about this. 

Of course, since your son won’t be learning with girls, aim to give him many opportunities to interact with them outside of school, so he can gain a wider scope of social experiences, where he'll learn from the perspective of boys and girls.

To access our report on the fit of extroverted kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Introverted

In a boys-only school, your introverted son can seek out and interact with different peer groups free from the distractions of a boy-girl environment. He’ll likely find it easier to come out of his shell and make like-minded friends without the intense pressure associated with navigating relationships with the other gender.

Just make sure any school you’re considering isn’t too focused on high energy and outgoing boys. While your son may enjoy the many group and physical activities offered in a boys-only environment, he may also sometimes prefer to sit quietly and read a book. Ensure he’ll have ample opportunity to do this.

Also, since your son won’t be learning with girls, aim to give him many opportunities to interact with them outside of school, so he can gain a wider scope of social experiences, where he'll learn from the perspective of boys and girls.

To access our report on the fit of introverted kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Highly focused

In a boys’ school, your son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions, which can sometimes be distracting, even for focused boys. This can enhance your son’s concentration and help him get the most out of his studies. Also, boys’ schools normally respect the differences between boys and girls, which can promote your son's academic and social development. “Just ask a prospective school how it meets the learning needs of students, and how they will meet your son’s needs, as learning styles can vary widely, even within a single gender,” says Stacey Jacobs, Toronto-based education consultant at Clear Path Educational Consulting.

Finally, make sure any school you’re considering isn’t too focused on “high energy” boys. While your son may enjoy the many group learning opportunities and physical activities normally offered in a boys-only environment, he may also sometimes prefer to sit quietly and read a book or work on a project. Ensure he’ll have ample opportunity to do this.

To access our report on the fit of highly focused kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Distractible

Since they often cater to active boys, boys’ schools tend to provide plenty of time for your son to stretch his legs, move around, and get physical. This can be a big perk for boys who are distractible and more energetic. “In an all-boys environment, boys learn to harness their energy in appropriate social ways, which can serve them well in the schoolyard, classroom, and beyond,” say Ann and Karen Wolff, Toronto-based education consultants at Wolff Educational Services. Also, many boys' schools have a special focus on group and experiential learning, which some distractible boys find engaging and stimulating. 

To ensure a particular boys’ school is the right fit for your son, inquire about its approach to social and personal development and boys’ education. For instance, ask: how do you encourage boys to seek out responsibility and leadership opportunities? And, how do you help them with their executive functioning skills?

To access our report on the fit of distractible kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Very physically active

Since they tend to cater to high-energy boys, most boys’ schools provide plenty of time for your active son to stretch his legs and move around. These schools normally have an especially wide range of physical activities, such as team and individual sports, to help your son channel his abundance of energy. “In an all-boys environment, boys learn to harness their energy in appropriate social ways, which will serve them well in the schoolyard, classroom, and beyond,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services.

Also, many boys' schools have a special focus on group and experiential learning, which your outgoing son may find engaging and stimulating. Inquire about this, and ask specific questions about a school's approach to personal, social, and academic development. For instance: How do you encourage boys to become more responsible and accountable? And, how do you help them with their organizational skills?

To access our report on the fit of very physically active kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Less physically active

If you’re considering a boys’ school for your less active son, make sure it isn’t too focused on “high energy” boys. While physical activities like sports have benefits for all boys, your son may sometimes prefer to sit quietly and read a book or work on a project, and it’s important to ensure he’ll have ample opportunity to do this.

Of course, having the ability to participate in a wide range of physical pursuits may help your son come out of his shell, explore new parts of himself, and scratch a latent itch for interaction. To gauge whether your son is the right fit, ask any prospective school about its approach to boys’ education and social and personal development.

To access our report on the fit of less physically active kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Intensively academically-focused

In a boys’ school, your academically-focused son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions. This can help him focus on his studies and pursue his learning interests free from some potential distractions. Also, boys’ schools normally respect the differences between boys and girls, which can help your son thrive academically and socially.

Just make sure any school you’re considering isn’t too focused on “high energy” boys. While your son may enjoy the many group learning opportunities and physical activities offered in a boys-only environment, he may also sometimes prefer to sit quietly and focus on an independent project or read a book. Ensure he’ll have ample opportunity to do this.

To access our report on the fit of intensively academically-focused kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Less academically-focused

Since they often cater to active boys, boys’ schools tend to provide plenty of time for your son to stretch his legs, move around, and get physical. This can be a big perk for less academically-focused boys who have lots of energy. “In an all-boys environment, boys learn to harness their energy in appropriate social ways, which can serve them well in the schoolyard, classroom, and beyond,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Services. Also, many boys' schools have a special focus on group and experiential learning, which many boys find engaging and motivating. 

To help determine whether a particular boys’ school is the right fit for your son, look into its approach to social and personal development and boys’ education. For instance, ask: how do you encourage boys to become more responsible and accountable? And, how do you help boys with their organizational skills?

To access our report on the fit of less academically-focused kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Arts-oriented

Boys’ schools enable your son to pursue his interest in the arts in an environment less shaped by gender stereotypes and false narratives, such as “girls are more suited to the arts than boys.” Many experts claim that boys, in a boys-only environment, are thus more likely to explore and excel in traditional girl-centric subjects, such as the fine and performing arts. In the tight-knit community of an all-boys school, one free of the distraction of opposite-gender relations, many boys gain the confidence needed to shine in uncharted waters and take artistic risks.

Just make sure any prospective school isn’t too focused on “high energy” boys. While physical activities like sports have benefits for all boys, you’ll want to make sure there’s enough arts-oriented programming and activities for your son, and plenty of creative outlets for him both in class and out.

To access our report on the fit of arts-oriented kids in several different school types, read our guide.


STEM-oriented

Many boys' schools have a special focus on STEM learning. They offer STEM courses and extracurriculars that will enable your son to pursue his passions and refine his skills. Also, in a boys-only school, your STEM-oriented son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions in class, which can help him focus on his studies free from some potential distractions. 

Just make sure any school you’re considering isn’t too focused on “high energy” boys. While your son may enjoy the group learning opportunities and physical activities offered in a boys-only environment, he may also sometimes prefer to sit quietly and focus on an independent project. Ensure he’ll have ample opportunity to do this. Also, since your son won’t be learning with girls in class, aim to give him opportunities to interact with them outside of school, so he can gain a wider scope of social experiences, where he’ll learn from the perspective of boys and girls.

To access our report on the fit of stem-oriented kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Gifted

In a boys’ school, your gifted son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions in the classroom, which can help him focus on his studies free from some potential distractions. Also, in an environment often less influenced by gender stereotypes and potentially false narratives, such as “girls are more suited to the arts than boys,” your son may feel freer to pursue his learning interests and take academic risks. "Sometimes you'll also find a special fraternal camaraderie in boys' schools that can help your son thrive socially,” says Joanne Foster, gifted education expert and author of ABCs of Raising Smarter Kids.

Just make sure any school you’re considering isn’t too focused on “high energy” boys. While your son may enjoy the group learning opportunities and physical activities offered in a boys-only environment, he may also sometimes prefer to sit quietly and focus on an independent project or read a book. Ensure he’ll have ample opportunity to do this. Also, since your son won’t be learning with girls, aim to give him opportunities to interact with them outside of school, so he can gain a wider scope of social experiences, where he’ll learn from the perspective of boys and girls.

To access our report on the fit of gifted kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Special needs

Make sure a boys’ school provides a learning environment that directly addresses your son’s special needs, whether this is a dedicated class, an integrated class, or a regular class with individualized learning and one-on-one support. Keep in mind, however, that “Generally, these schools look for boys who can function independently in the classroom and don’t require modified programs," say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. For instance, most boys’ schools would be unable or unwilling to lower the academic standards for a child with a learning or developmental disability.

Of course, in a boys-only school, your son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions, which can help them focus on their work free from potential distractions. Also, in an environment often less influenced by gender stereotypes and false narratives, such as “girls are more suited to the arts than boys,” he may feel freer to pursue his learning interests and carve out a unique developmental path.

To access our report on the fit of special needs kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Learning disabilities

Make sure a boys’ school provides a learning environment that directly supports your son’s learning disability (or disabilities), whether this is a segregated class, integrated class, or regular class with special adaptations or accommodations. Keep in mind, however, that “Typically, these schools look for boys who can function independently in the classroom and don’t require modified programs,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. For instance, most boys’ schools would be unwilling to alter or lower the academic standards for a boy with an LD, by, say, giving him different tests than his peers.  

Of course, in a boys-only school, your son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions. This can free him up from potential distractions, in class and out, which can help him better focus on his studies. Also, in an environment often less shaped by gender stereotypes and false narratives, such as “girls are better suited to the arts than boys,” your son may feel freer to pursue his learning interests and take academic risks.

To access our report on the fit of learning disabilities kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Social/emotional issues

Make sure a boys’ school provides a learning environment that directly addresses your son’s social issue(s), such as a segregated or integrated class, or a regular class with individualized learning and one-on-one support. Keep in mind, however, that “Generally, these schools look for boys who can function independently in the classroom,” say Ann and Karen Wolff of Wolff Educational Consulting. This means many boys’ schools won’t be able to support students with severe emotional or behavioural disorders such as oppositional defiance disorder (ODD).

Of course, in an all-boys school, your son won’t have to negotiate the complexities of boy-girl interactions, which can help him focus on his work free from potential distractions. Also, in an environment often less influenced by gender stereotypes and false narratives, such as “girls are more suited to the arts than boys,” he may feel freer to pursue his learning interests and carve out a unique developmental path.

To access our report on the fit of social/emotional issues kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Conventional learner

Boys’ schools differ in their teaching and learning approaches. Some cater to conventional learners, offering teacher-led instruction, whole-class lectures, pre-planned units, plenty of structure. Others offer only some or (in rare cases) none of these things.

Some all-boys schools prioritize experiential learning—where kids learn more by doing than listening—and plenty of group work. These particular schools won’t work for some conventional learners—i.e., those who prefer more direct instruction and textbook learning. To gauge whether your son is likely to be a good fit, ask a school about its teaching and learning approach and whether (and to what extent) it emphasizes experiential and group learning.

To access our report on the fit of conventional learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Unconventional learner

Some boys’ schools cater to unconventional learners, offering a student-focused curriculum, individualized learning, and lots of opportunities to explore one’s interests. Some also emphasize experiential and collaborative learning, which many unconventional learners enjoy.

Since boys’ schools vary in their teaching and learning approaches, ask specific questions to gauge your child’s fit.

Boys’ schools enable your son to pursue his interests in an environment less shaped by gender stereotypes and false narratives such as “girls are more suited to the arts than boys.” Many experts claim that boys, in a boys-only environment, are thus more likely to explore and excel in traditional girl-centric subjects, such as music, writing, and the arts.

To access our report on the fit of unconventional learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Independent learner

Boys’ schools vary in their emphasis on independent learning. Some prioritize student-focused learning, which gives boys plenty of opportunities to pursue their interests. Others offer a more conventional approach, with more teacher-led instruction and lots of textbook learning. Yet others feature experiential learning—which can be collaborative or independent. 

Most boys-only schools recognize that learning styles differ widely, even within a single gender. Ask how a school meets the learning needs of boys, and how it will meet your son’s needs. Don’t be afraid to get specific: For instance, “I have a distractible son who enjoys language arts activities. How will you teach him creative writing?”

To access our report on the fit of independent learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.


Collaborative learner

Many boys’ schools emphasize collaborative and group learning. Sometimes this includes experiential, hands-on learning, which many collaborative learners enjoy. “Just ask a school how it meets the learning needs of boys, and how they will meet your son’s needs,” says Stacey Jacobs, Director of Clear Path Education. “Most boys’ schools recognize that learning styles vary widely, even within a single gender.”

Also, in an all-boys school, your son can seek out and interact with different peer groups free from the complexities of boy-girl interactions. He’ll find it easier to focus on finding like-minded peers and pursuing social and learning opportunities without the intense pressure and distraction associated with interacting with the other gender. “A fraternal camaraderie is also sometimes seen in these schools,” says Joanne Foster, education consultant and author of ABCs of Raising Smarter Kids. “That kind of milieu can be very supportive.”

To access our report on the fit of collaborative learner kids in several different school types, read our guide.

Find Private Schools:

In the spotlight:



Our Kids The Trusted Source
Our Kids The Trusted Source

Disclaimer: Information presented on this page may be paid advertising provided by the advertisers [schools/camps/programs] and is not warranted or guaranteed by OurKids.net or its associated websites. See Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. Our Kids ™ © 2019 All right reserved.

Sign up to receive our exclusive eNews twice a month.

You can withdraw consent by unsubscribing anytime.

Name
Email
verification image, type it in the box
Our Kids From Our Kids, Canada’s trusted source for private schools, camps, and extracurriculars.