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Ellington Montessori School

   
40 Cowdray Court, Toronto, Ontario, M1S 1A1
40 Cowdray Court, Scarborough, Ontario, M1S 1A1
ADD TO SHORTLIST   Website
Curriculum:
Montessori
Grades (Gender):
Nursery/Toddler (12 months) to 8 (Coed)
Tuition:
$7,900 to 14,000/year
Main Language:
English
Avg. Class Size:
15 to 24
Enrolment:
Day: Varies (Gr. NS - 8)

School Address
40 Cowdray Court, Toronto, Ontario, M1S 1A1

About this school:

highlights

Ellington Montessori School is conveniently located at 401 and Kennedy and is CCMA accredited. Established in 1990, EMS is a licensed daycare and private school educating students from Nursery (15 months) to Grade 8. The objective of our program is to help guide each child to reach his potential and to assist each student in recognizing his own capacity to make a difference in the world. The population reflects a diverse community and prides itself on its outstanding reputation within the private school community. — Visit school website




Reviews:

highlights

The Our Kids review of Ellington Montessori School

our take

Since it was founded in 1990, Ellington has grown its reputation on providing a solid, comprehensive academic experience. The school has developed its program, on one hand, with the needs of parents foremost in mind—before and after care, meals, and beginning in early childhood. Likewise, they’ve developed summer programs which allow for children to stay within a familiar setting throughout the year. From the child’s perspective, the community is very close-knit and personal, true to the foundational concepts of the Montessori method. It’s very much a home away from home, delivering students confident and prepared to succeed at secondary school.





Principal's Message

principal

Deborah Renwick, Principal

On behalf of our staff, I would like to welcome you to Ellington Montessori School.

A culturally diverse school, EMS is a tight knit community, an extension of one's family, rather than an institution. The objective of our caring, committed staff is to help guide each child to reach his or her potential academically, socially, and emotionally; and to assist each student in recognizing his or her own capacity to actively make a difference in the world. We incorporate the values of EMS into the daily life and culture of the school, rather than represent them in symbols or rote recitations. Students are encouraged by example, to respect the talents and perspectives of others and to work collaborativel and pursue personl interests.

Parental cooperation, communication and understanding are paramount to providing a successful, productive and satisfying educational experience for your child. 

Our mission is: To Inspire = To Engage + Motivate = Success

Yours in education,

Deborah Renwick

Head-of-School


Academics


Curriculum Montessori

Primary Curriculum: Montessori

Particularly popular in the younger grades (preschool to elementary), but sometimes available all the way up to high school, Montessori schools offer an alternative vision to the standard lesson format of most classrooms. Lessons are highly decentralized: children typically work individually (though sometimes with others) on specialized "Montessori materials" -- without interference from the teacher. The materials are self-correcting and teach the student something about the subject at hand. The method's goal is to develop children's innate desire to learn, while freeing up time for teachers to help children individually, as needed.

If you want to learn more about Montessori education, check out our comprehensive guide. You can also check out our guide to Montessori preschools, elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools.


What EMS says: Ellington Montessori School is dedicated to the development of the whole child (social, academic and physical) in a safe, nurturing environment. At EMS, we: • provide an environment which is conducive to learning and appealing to the child • foster respect for others and self • support individuality and celebrate differences • build self-esteem and confidence • offer a wide variety of experiences to broaden the mind and the body By committing ourselves to our students and families, it is our expectation that when students graduate from Ellington Montessori School, they are equipped with the necessary skills to reach their fullest potential and contribute to society in a positive and meaningful manner. The school population reflects a diverse multicultural community. The faculty and students contribute to community via outreach programmes and community services. Ellington Montessori School prides itself on its outstanding reputation within the Montessori and private school community as having a highly regarded academic and well-rounded educational program.

  • Montessori offered:
    Program = offered
    Montessori toddler
    Casa
    Elementary
    Middle School
    High School
  • Approach:
    Focus Language-based
    Academic French immersion


  • Pedagogies and subject courses:

  • Mathematics Traditional Math

      Traditional Math typically teaches a method or algorithm FIRST, and THEN teaches the applications for the method. Traditional algorithms are emphasized and practiced regularly: repetition and drills are frequently used to ensure foundational mastery in the underlying mathematical procedures. The traditional approach to math views math education as akin to building a logical edifice: each brick depends on the support of the previously laid ones, which represent mastery over a particular procedure or method. Traditional Math begins by giving students a tool, and then challenges students to practice using that tool an applied way, with progressively challenging problems. In this sense Traditional Math aims to establish procedural understanding before conceptual and applied understanding.
      Learn about the different mathematics approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.

    • Textbooks and supplementary materials: This information is not currently available.

    • Calculator policy: This information is not currently available.


    Early Reading Phonics-intensive

      Systematic-phonics programs teach young children to read by helping them to recognize and sound out the letters and syllables of words. Students are then led to blend these sounds together to sound out and recognize the whole word. While other reading programs might touch on phonetics (either incidentally or on a “when needed” basis), systematic phonics teaches phonics in a specific sequence, and uses extensive repetition and direct instruction to help readers associate specific letter patterns with their associated sounds.
      Learn about the different early reading approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.

    • DIBELS Testing: This school does not use DIBELS testing to assess reading progress.

    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Writing Equal balance

      Programs that balance systematic and process approaches equally likely have an emphasis on giving young students ample opportunities to write, while providing supplementary class-wide instruction in grammar, parts of sentences, and various writing strategies.
      Learn about the different writing approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Science Inquiry

      Inquiry-based science emphasizes teaching science as a way of thinking or practice, and therefore tries to get students “doing” science as much as possible -- and not just “learning” it. Students still learn foundational scientific ideas and content (and build on this knowledge progressively); however, relative to expository science instruction, inquiry-based programs have students spend more time developing and executing their own experiments (empirical and theoretical). Students are frequently challenged to develop critical and scientific-thinking skills by developing their own well-reasoned hypothesis and finding ways to test those hypotheses. Projects and experiments are emphasized over textbook learning. Skills are emphasized over breadth of knowledge.
      Learn about the different science approaches  


    • Teaching approach: This information is not currently available.

    • Topics covered in curriculum:

      Subject = offered
      Biology
      Chemistry
      Ecology
      Geology
      Meteorology
      Physics
      Physiology
      Zoology
    • Treatment of evolution:

      Evolution as consensus theory
      Evolution as one of many equally viable theories
      Evolution is not taught

    Literature Social Justice

      In social justice- inspired programs, literature is not viewed as something to be merely decoded and “appreciated”: rather, it is viewed as a catalyst to social action. Choice of texts tends to favour contemporary works. If a classical text is used, it’s often in the context of social deconstruction: students are asked to critically examine possible prejudices and historical narratives inherent in the work. Like in traditional literature programs, students are often asked to engage in class discussion and critical essay writing, but more time might also be devoted to cooperative group projects and personal reflections. The goal is to teach students to think critically about what they read, while becoming intellectually and physically engaged in the social issues pertaining to their wider community.
      Learn about the different literature approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Social Studies Expanding Communities

      The Expanding Communities approach organizes the curriculum around students’ present, everyday experience. In the younger grades, students might learn about themselves, for example. As they move through the grades, the focus gradually broadens in scope: to the family, neighbourhood, city, province, country, and globe. The curriculum tends to have less focus on history than Core Knowledge programs.
      Learn about the different social studies approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Humanities and Social Sciences Perennialism

      Perennialism in the humanities and social sciences emphasizes the idea of education being a kind of “conversation” between generations, and so frequently turns to “Great Works” and “Big Ideas” for teaching-content. Perennialist programs approach past works on their own terms; as if they might actually help students understand “today” better. Past works are not viewed as mere historical artifacts, but as gateways to a deeper understanding of the human condition. History (and, by extension, the humanities in general) therefore plays a large role in perennialist curriculums, though social sciences like economics, psychology, and sociology can still be taught. There is a strong Liberal Arts bent to perennialist programs. The key goals are to develop critical thinking, a strong foundation of core knowledge (or “cultural literacy”), and persuasion skills through informed debate and extensive practice in essay writing.
      Learn about the different humanities and social sciences approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Foreign Languages Communicative

      The communicative method of language acquisition emphasizes the use of the target language in authentic contexts. The approach commonly features interactive group work, games, authentic texts, and opportunities to learn about the cultural background of the language. Drills and quizzes may still be used, but less frequently than with the audio-lingual method.
      Learn about the different foreign languages approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.

    • Languages Offered: • French


    Fine Arts Equal Balance

      These programs have an equal emphasis on receptive and creative learning.
      Learn about the different fine arts approaches  


    • Program offers:

      Subject = offered
      Acting
      Dance
      Drama/Theatre
      Graphic Design
      Music
      Visual Arts
    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Computers and Technology Medium integration

      Effort is made to integrate the development of digital literacy through the curriculum. However, this is not a dominant focus.
      Learn about the different computers and technology approaches  


    • What EMS says: This information is not currently available.

    • Program covers:

      Subject = offered
      Computer science
      Robotics
      Web design

    Physical Education
    • What EMS says: All EMS sports curriculum units include stretching, running, basic movements, and games. Students participate in skill building games focused on team building, learning individual strengths and areas for development, self-discipline, coordination, balance, endurance, sportsmanship, overall fitness and skill building for specific sports. Students are introduced to a variety of games and exercise, throwing and catching, relay races, obstacle courses, and drills. In addition, students participate in a variety of co-curricula’s (skating, skiing, yoga, martial arts, and dance.)


    Sex and Health Education Doesn’t follow Ontario curriculum
    Topics covered in sex and health education:
    Topics We begin covering this topic at: Begins in Ontario
    Body parts JK Gr. 1
    Nutrition JK Gr. 1
    Human development JK Gr. 1
    Puberty Gr. 4 Gr. 4
    Sexual health and hygiene Gr. 3 Gr. 4
    Reproduction SK Gr. 5
    Pregnancy Gr. 6 Gr. 7
    Sexually transmitted infections Gr. 6 Gr. 7
    Sex and decision-making Gr. 6 Gr. 7
    Contraception Gr. 6 Gr. 8
    Consent SK Gr. 9
    Sexual orientation Gr. 6 Gr. 8
    Gender identity Gr. 6 Gr. 8
    Misconceptions relating to sexuality Gr. 6 Gr. 10
    Relationships and intimacy Gr. 6 Gr. 8
    Bias and stereotyping about sex Gr. 6 Gr. 12
    Sexual harassment Gr. 6 Gr. 9
    Body image issues SK Gr. 7
    Mental illness Gr. 6 Gr. 11
    Social justice and diversity JK

    What EMS says: This information is not currently available.

    Approach:
    Mostly value-neutral

    By and large, we teach sex education free of any particular moral or ethical standpoint. We try not to impose any particular values or value systems (such as social, political, or ideological values) on our students when teaching sex and related issues.


    Fairly value-based

    Sex education is sometimes taught from a particular moral or ethical standpoint. Sometimes particular values or value systems (such as social, political, or ideological values) are invoked when teaching sex and related issues.

    Traditional

    This includes a range of positions. A traditional approach might, for example, go as far as emphasizing the nuclear family and complete abstinence from sex before marriage. Alternatively, this approach might simply involve placing less emphasis on sex outside of the context of marriage and more emphasis on abstinence. Or finally, it might just involve focusing less on sex outside of the context of marriage.

    Progressive

    This might mean more emphasis is placed on the importance of such things as social equality, diversity, and choice in sex education.


    What EMS says: Sex and health education discussions take place when they are developmentally appropriate and are based on the age, stage and maturity of each child.



    Montessori ApproachModerately Non-Orthodox

    CLASSROOM PRACTICES
    SCHOOL POLICIES: This information is not currently available.

    Whole-class lectures
    • Orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should never be given. Students learn best through small group lessons, interaction, and independent work.

    • Moderately orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should only be given occasionally (e.g., at the beginning of a term or unit). Students usually learn best through small group lessons, interaction, and independent work.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should be given semi-regularly (e.g., at the beginning of a lesson or a week). While students often learn best through group and independent work, it's sometimes important for teachers to set the stage for and contextualize learning.

    • Non-orthodox

      Whole-class lectures should be given often (e.g., every day). While group and independent learning is important, teachers need to provide lectures on a regular basis to provide the foundation for learning.



    Special education
    • Orthodox

      External special education support isn't necessary. Core teachers can deal with all special education needs, by offering the relevant support for each student.

    • Moderately orthodox

      External special education support is only rarely necessary. For instance, a psychologist might be brought in to help out a student with a severe developmental disorder.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      External special education support is quite important. Outside specialists are needed for a fairly wide range of special needs, such as developmental and learning disabilities.

    • Non-orthodox

      External special education support is very important. Outside specialists are regularly brought in to support students with many different types of special needs, including developmental and learning disabilities, language and speech issues, behavioural issues, and advanced learning abilities.



    Specialist classes
    • Orthodox

      We don't have any specialist teachers or classes. Core teachers are well-equipped to teach all subjects.

    • Moderately orthodox

      We only use specialist teachers and classes in rare cases (for instance, to teach a second language). Core teachers are well-equipped to teach almost all subjects.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      We have a fairly wide range of specialist teachers and classes (for instance, in languages, music, and art). Core teachers are well-equipped to teach most subjects.

    • Non-orthodox

      We have many specialist teachers and classes (for instance, in languages, music, art, gym, science, and math). It's important that students receive specialized instruction in many subjects.



    Modern-day technology
    • Orthodox

      Modern-day technology is never used in the classroom. This can interfere with students' social and emotional development and can be a distraction.

    • Moderately orthodox

      Modern-day technology is very rarely used in class, since it can be a distraction and interfere with development. Students at the upper levels, though, might be permitted to use a computer or a tablet to do research for a specific project.

    • Moderately non-orthodox

      Modern-day technology is used in moderation since it can be a distraction. For instance, computers and other digital media might be used for research, writing, and multimedia projects.

    • Non-orthodox

      Modern technology is used fairly regularly. For instance, computers and other digital media might be used for research, writing, multimedia projects, and to learn keyboarding skills. Teachers may sometimes also use digital media, such as interactive whiteboards, to teach lessons or introduce topics.



    Overall approach : Whick option best describes your overall curricular approach?
    • Orthodox
      38% of schools

      Schools that adhere strictly to the original Montessori program. They follow Montessori principles to the letter.

    • Moderately Orthodox
      34% of schools

      Schools that adhere to the original Montessori program and principles. On occasion, though, they supplement it with modern curricular approaches or materials.

    • Moderately Non-Orthodox
      12% of schools

      Schools that are faithful to the original Montessori program and principles, but sometimes supplement it with modern curricular approaches or materials.

    • Non-orthodox
      16% of schools

      Schools that are faithful to the original Montessori program and principles, but often supplement it with modern curricular approaches or materials.


    Teaching Assistants: This school uses teaching assistants.

    Preschool/K Curriculum Montessori

    • Play-based
    • Montessori
    • Waldorf
    • Reggio Emilia
    • Academic

    Montessori programs aimed at preschool and Kindergarten- aged children allow young learners to choose which “tasks” or activities interest them. These tasks centre around special Montessori puzzles -- the essential features of these puzzles being they contain a “right answer” and allow for self-correction. A strong emphasis is therefore placed on learning being concrete and rooted in practical experience, along with children developing a sense of self-sufficiency and confidence. Specially trained teachers act as guides, introducing children to progressively more difficult materials when appropriate. A Montessori classroom is typically very calm and orderly, with children working alone or, sometimes, in small groups.

    If you want to learn more about Montessori education, check out our comprehensive guide. You can also check out our guide to Montessori preschools, elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools.

    If you want to learn more about preschool education, check out our comprehensive guide. You can also read our in-depth answers to important preschool questions: What is preschool? What are the main preschool programs? What are the main pros and cons of preschool? What do children learn in preschool? How much does preschool cost?  What makes for a great preschool?

    What EMS says: In addition traditional Montessori teachings, we honour all types of intelligences and styles of learning. The indvidulized learning syles are nurtured whether it be: musical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, interpersonal, intrapersonal, intuitive, and the traditional linguistic and logical-mathematical (reading, writing, and math). This particular model is backed up by Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner\'s Theory of Multiple Intelligences.


    Curriculum Pace Student-paced

    • Standard-enriched
    • Accelerated
    • Student-paced

    The main curriculum pace is non-standardized and is HIGHLY responsive to the pacing of individual students, (via differentiated instruction, differentiated assessment, etc). In theory, some students outpace the default/normalized curriculum, while others spend periods "behind schedule" if they need the extra time.

    Flexible pacing:

    Flexible pacing style = offered
    Subject-streaming (tracking)
    Multi-age classrooms as standard
    Ability-grouping (in-class) as common
    Frequent use of cyber-learning (at-their-own-pace)
    Regular guided independent study opportunities
    Differentiated assessment

    What EMS says about flexible pacing: This information is not currently available.


    Academic Culture Supportive

    • Rigorous
    • Supportive

    A school with a “supportive” academic culture focuses more on process than short-term outcomes: academic performance is a welcomed side-benefit, but not the driving focus. This does not mean the school lacks standards, or has low expectations for its students: a school can have a supportive academic culture and still light the fire of ambition in its students. It does mean, however, the school provides a less intensive culture than schools with a “rigorous” academic classification, and is focused more simply on instilling a love of learning and life-long curiosity.

    What EMS says: This information is not currently available.


    Developmental Priorities Intellectual, Emotional

    Primary Developmental Priority: Intellectual
    Academically strong, creative, and critical thinkers, capable of exercising rationality, apprehending truth, and making aesthetic distinctions.

    Secondary Developmental Priority: Emotional
    Emotionally intelligent and confident individuals, capable of leading both themselves and others.

    What EMS says: At EMS, we teach children of all ages to self-advocate and to develop critical thinking skills. When a child is able to trust that he or she is safe and secure, this creates a feeling of community and security, which in turn allows openness to learning.


    Special Needs Support High

    High

    EMS provides a high degree of support for special needs students.

    • Academic Support:
      Support Type = offered
      Learning strategy and study counselling; habit formation
      Extra support and minor accommodations for children experiencing subclinical difficulties
    • Mild but clinically diagnosed ADHD
      Support Type = offered
      Accommodations
      Modifications
      Extra support
    • What EMS says: EMS favours early intervention. Mild learning disabilities can be accommodated with outside support. Moderate to severe diagnosis may require additional external support or services. We have access to several professionals who can provide support and/or therapy as fee-based services.

    • Support for moderate-to-severe special needs:
      Special needs
      Learning disabilities
      ADHD (moderate to severe)
      Dyslexia (Language-Based Learning Disability)
      Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)
      Dyscalculia
      Dysgraphia
      Language Processing Disorder
      Nonverbal Learning Disorders (NLD)
      Visual Perceptual/Visual Motor Deficit
      Developmental
      Autism
      Asperger's Syndrome
      Down syndrome
      Intellectual disability
      Behavioral and Emotional
      Troubled behaviour / troubled teens
      Clinical Depression
      Suicidal thoughts
      Drug and alcohol abuse
      Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)
      Physical
      Dyspraxia (Developmental Coordination Disorder)
      Blindness
      Deafness
      Cystic Fibrosis
      Multiple physical
    • Forms of support delivery:
      Support Type = offered
      A regular class with indirect support
      A regular class with resource assistance
      A regular class with withdrawal assistance
      A special education class with partial integration
      A full-time special education class
    • Additional Support:
      Support Type = offered
      Social skills programs
      Occupational therapy
      Psychotherapy
      Speech-language therapy
    • What EMS says: EMS favours early intervention. Mild learning disabilities can be accommodated with outside support. Moderate to severe diagnosis may require additional external support or services. We have access to several professionals who can provide support and/or therapy as fee-based services.


    Gifted Learner Support In-class adaptations

    Dedicated gifted programs:

    Program = offered
    Full-time gifted program (parallel to rest of school)
    Part-time gifted program (pull-out; parallel to rest of class)

    Curriculum delivery: Acceleration and enrichment (There is an equal emphasis on acceleration and enrichment.)

    In-class adaptations:
    Practice = offered
    Custom subject enrichment (special arrangement)
    Custom curriculum compacting (special arrangement)
    Guided independent study (custom gifted arrangement)
    Cyber-learning opportunities (custom gifted arrangement)
    Formalized peer coaching opportunities (specifically for gifted learners to coach others)
    Custom subject acceleration (special arrangement)
    Career exploration (custom gifted arrangement)
    Project-based learning (custom gifted arrangement)
    Mentorships (custom gifted arrangement)

    What EMS says: This information is not currently available.

    Gifted education: If you want to learn more about gifted education, check out our comprehensive guide. It’s the first of its kind: it covers different kinds of gifted schools and programs, and a whole host of issues parents face in finding the right option for their gifted child.

    Homework Policy

    In grade 8, Ellington Montessori School students perform an average of 1 hour of homework per night.

    Nightly Homework
    NSPSJKSK12345678
    EMS 0 mins0 mins0 mins0 mins15 mins15 mins30 mins30 mins45 mins45 mins60 mins60 mins
    Site Average0 mins2 mins5 mins7 mins16 mins18 mins24 mins29 mins34 mins40 mins53 mins58 mins

    Report Card Policy

    How assessments are delivered across the grades:

    Prose (narrative)-based feedbackNursery/Toddler to 8
    Academic achievement reportingNursery/Toddler to 8
    Habits and behaviour reportingNursery/Toddler to 8
    Parent-teacher meetingsNursery/Toddler to 8

    Class Sizes Not available

    This information is not currently available.

    Recess Policy

     GradesNSPSJKSK12345678
    Non-lunch recessFrequency 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day 2/day
    Location Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside Outside
    Amount 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45
    Lunch recessAmount 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60

    What EMS says: This information is not currently available.



    Extracurriculars

    principal
    What EMS says:

    This information is not currently available.


    • Sports OfferedCompetitiveRecreational
      Baseball
      Basketball
      Canoeing/Kayaking
      Cricket
      Downhill skiing
      Field Hockey
      Figure Skating
      Gymnastics
      Ice Hockey
      Lacrosse
      Martial Arts
      Rowing
      Snowboarding
      Soccer
      Softball
      Swimming
      Tennis
      Track & Field
      Volleyball
    • Clubs Offered
      Choir
      Community Service
      Debate Club
      Outdoor Education
      Yearbook
      Yoga

    Tuition & Financial Aid

    Tuition

     
    NSPSJKSK12345678
    Day$7,900$13,500
    What EMS says: Ellington Montessori School offers half day, full day and before and after school care. We run summer camps for all ages. The camp for Nursery to SK follows the self-learning model along with outdoor activities each day. The older students participate in a Leaders in Training program. This program teaches skills such as cooking and gardening, to organization of both small and large projects.

    Discounts

    Discount TypeEnrollment TypeAmount
    Full payment all students3%
    Early paymentall students3%
    2nd child (sibling)all students3%
    3rd child (sibling)all students3%
    4th child (sibling)all students3%


    Need-based financial aid

    Grade range that need-based aid is offered: 1 to 8
    Percentage of grade-eligible students receiving financial aid5%
    Average aid package size$3,000
    Percentage of total enrollment on financial aid5%
    Total aid available$10,000

    Application Deadline:
    Rolling deadline Repeats annually

    More information:

    Application Details:

    This school works with other. for processing financial applications
    Financial statements and related supporting documents Letter outlining needs based requirement



    Merit based Scholarships

    This information is not currently available.


    Enrollment

    Total enrollment Varies
    Average enrollment per gradeVaries
    Average class size15 to 24
    Gender (grades)Nursery/Toddler (12 months) to 8 (Coed)
    Boarding offeredNo

    Student distribution:

    NSPSJKSK12345678
    Day Enrollment151020201414141414141414

    Admission

    Application

    Admissions Assessments:

    Assessment = requiredGrades
    InterviewN/A
    SSAT
    SSAT (out of province)
    Entrance Exam(s)
    Entrance Essay
    Application Fee 

    Application Deadlines:

    Day students:
    Rolling


    What EMS says:

    Admissions 

    At EMS we use the admissions process to help families ensure that EMS is the right fit for their child. We consider students and families that have shared values and support the principles and philosophy of Montessori. At EMS we value integrity, respect and collaboration, among other virtues. We feel that family and school are the cornerstones to support the learner and thus wish to create a partnership.

    The Montessori curriculum is based on a three-year approach and results are best achieved when the full cycle is met. Children are split into three-year family groupings with the exception of the toddler and middle school programmes.

    EMS admits students regardless of gender, creed or ethnicity.

    At EMS we seek to Inspire to Engage, Motivate, Succeed

    Toddler Admission Policy:

    1. Families are expected to come for a tour to see the school, visit the toddler classroom and meet with the Head-of-School or Designate.
    2. Children applying to EMS the toddler programme must be able to walk and self-feed by hand or with utensil. 
    3. Children are not required to be toilet trained; toileting supplies are the responsibility of the family.
    4. Families are expected to support the phase-in period, which may include daily attendance for abbreviated periods of time.
    5. Standard student teacher ratio is 5:1
    6. A child applying for placement in the toddler class is expected to attend a two-hour personal visit, without a primary caregiver prior to admission being offered.

    Casa Admission Policy:

    1. Families are expected to come for a tour to see the school, visit the casa classroom and meet with the Head-of-School or Designate.
    2. Children applying for casa must be capable of recognizing when he/she must use the toilet and be able to independently clean him/herself once there.
    3. Casa children should be able to self-feed using a utensil.
    4. A child applying for placement in the casa class is expected to attend a two-hour personal visit, without a primary caregiver, for individual assessment prior to admission being offered.
    5. It is recommended that a child be no older than four years of age upon enrolment and should attend at least one year of the full day program. Children who have surpassed their fourth birthday will be accepted upon the discretion of the Head-of-School or Designate, according to school and/or family requirements.
    6. Favour is given to children whom have attended a Montessori programme.
    7. Standard student teacher ratio is 15:1 or lower.
    8. Families will submit assessments or reports from any previous programmes.
    9. Family agrees to a three month probationary period.

    Elementary Admission Policy:

    1. Students over the age of six, seeking entrance into the elementary programmes, are required to have an academic evaluation (by EMS) and spend a minimum of one full day in the classroom. The purpose of this evaluation and visitation is to determine whether the school can meet the needs of the student and whether the student and family will blend with the school community.
    2. The family and child/ren are to tour the school, visit in the respective classroom and meet with the Head-of-School or Designate and classroom teacher.
    3. During said visit, supporting documents are to be submitted (i.e. reports, assessments).
    4. Family agrees to a three month probationary period.
    5. Standard student teacher ratio is 16:1 or lower.


     

     



    Acceptance

    Acceptance Rate:

    75%

    Type of student Ellington Montessori School is looking for: Today’s students are tomorrow’s leaders. The qualities of a student are of great impact to determine the student's bright future and career. EMS students will possess the following: Motivation Concentration on Studies Behaviour/self-regulation Management Helping Others and Advising



    Student Entry Points

    Student TypeNSPSJKSK12345678
    Day Acceptance
    (Acceptance rate)
    5 - 10 (100%)1 - 15 (100%)1 - 10 (100%)1 - 10 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)1 - 5 (100%)

    Stories & Testimonials

    News

    Goals and achievments

    The goals of Montessori education are to cultivate each child's natural desire to learn, acquire and master skills, learn responsibility and cooperation and foster strong, positive feelings about oneself and others. The method addresses the total child developing social skills, emotional growth, physical coordination, and cognitive preparation, within a thoughtfully designed environment. Read on to see what others thought: 

    I am so glad that I selected Ellington, a well balanced school, which had built the fundamentals for my children to become well balanced humans. Jenny Wang - parent

    We sincerely feel the love of learning, strong life values and the intellectual simulation gained by Téa and Elise at EMS will serve as a strong, solid foundation as they grow up and move forward with their lives. Today, our girls are both excelling in their respective schools.  George, Joanne, Téa and Elise Christopoulos​ - EMS Alumni

    What a pleasure to teach the students at your school! So eager, willing and excited to learn. I teach a lot of kids in my week, and want to say that your school is doing a great job instilling respect, curiosity and willingness to learn and grow. Ella Isakov - Yoga Instructor ​

    I wouldn't be the person I am today without EMS and Deborah Renwick. The best there is. Aaron Marshall - Alumni

    Ellington prepared me for post-secondary education. I watched others flounder my first year university and attributed my success to EMS' early training on self-regulation, seeing things through to completion and  discipline.  Asha Shelton M.H.Sc., SLP - Alumni

     

    ...



    Faculty

    The faculty at Ellington Montessori School are dedicated professionals, who foster a love of learning and provide a safe, nurturing and academically challenging environment for the students. The staff are university educated holding a BA degree or higher and are trained from MACTE accredited Montessori institutions.

    Teachers and school staff, under the leadership of the Head-of-School, maintain order in the school and are expected to hold everyone to the highest standard of respectful and responsible behaviour. As role models, staff members uphold these high standards when they:

    • help students work to their full potential and develop their self-worth.
    • communicate regularly and meaningfully with parents.
    • maintain consistent standards of behaviour for all students.
    • demonstrate respect for all students, staff and parents.
    • prepare students for the full responsibilities of citizenship.

    All faculty and adults who are in regular contact with the students are required to submit an annual police reference check as safety is a primary concern. 

    Ellington Montessori School is dedicated to the development of the whole child (social, academic and physical) in a safe, nurturing environment.  At EMS, we:

    •    provide an environment which is conducive to learning and appealing to the child 
    •    foster respect for others and self
    •    support individuality and celebrate differences 
    •    build self-esteem and confidence
    •    offer a wide variety of experiences to broaden the mind and the body

     

    ...



    Our History

    Ellington Montessori School was founded in 1990 by Ms.  Deborah L. Renwick.  The school opened the school with the purpose of operating a single Casa classroom accommodating 20 students. By the end of the first year, enrolment had increased substantially and expansion was on the horizon.  The fall of 1992, the first elementary class was opened and the school grew over the next decade to include classes up to the 8th grade.  Eventually, EMS outgrew its cozy Lawrence Avenue. campus, and in February of 2013 moved to its current location at 40 Cowdray Court, just north of the 401 off of Kennedy Road, in Toronto.  EMS’ new home is a single-story building boasting 20,000 square feet of space, situated on two and a half acres of land.

    The school has seven classrooms: Toddler (18mos.-2.5 years), Casa (2.5 years-6 years), Lower Elementary (6-9 years), Upper Elementary (9-12 years) and Middle School (12-14 years) a designated French classroom and one class being used as a common drop off area, at this time . The classrooms were specially built-out featuring unique natural light features and access to water and washroom facilities either close by or in class (toddler only).  The school population reflects a diverse multicultural community.  The faculty and students contribute to community via outreach programmes and community services. Ellington Montessori School prides itself on its outstanding reputation within the Montessori and private school community as having a highly regarded academic and well-rounded educational program.  EMS is an accredited school and is in compliance with current Building Code, Fire Code, and Ministry of Health requirements and is listed under the Ministry of Education.  All faculty and adults who are in regular contact with the students are required to submit an annual police reference check as safety is a primary concern.

    Ms. Renwick, the current Head-of-School and sole owner/operator of EMS, sat on the CCMA Board of Directors for over a decade, in numerous positions. She was instrumental in the development of its website, the accreditation process and best practices.  EMS received its first accreditation in 1998. Ms. Renwick continues to support CCMA as a consultant.

    Ellington Montessori School is dedicated to the development of the whole child (social, academic and physical) in a safe, nurturing environment.  At EMS, we:

    • provide an environment which is conducive to learning  and appealing to the child
    • foster respect for others and self
    • support individuality and celebrate differences
    • build self-esteem and confidence
    • offer a wide variety of experiences to broaden the mind and the body

     

     

    ...



    Associations

    Associations
    • The Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators (CCMA) Associations


    Social Feeds

    Social





    Next Steps


    The most direct action you can take is to plan a school visit. This is the best way to learn more about a school, and requires no obligation.





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