Welcome to Our Kids.

brain-power-ways-neuroscience-will-change-education-21334

We’re here to help you find the right school, the right way.

For more than 20 years we’ve worked with leading education and child development experts to explore and improve the school-choice process. The result is a robust suite of tools—used by over 2.6 million families every year—which enable you to choose your best-fit school among the 350+ profiled on this site.

We’re your virtual school-placement consultant: your personal guide to discovering, evaluating, and choosing the right school for your child.

Take 2 minutes now to open your free account. It will give you access to exclusive insights on how specific schools are a fit (or not) for your student’s learning needs.


Open my free account
Welcome to Our Kids

Brain power: five ways neuroscience will change education

Find a list of schools

Neuroscience isn't just for scientists anymore. The way experts study how children's brains develop over time is influencing classrooms and education overall, and here are the five ways education will begin to change because of it.


Neuroscience in education
Neuroeducation will play a key role in the future of education, with curricula based not just on teaching subjects but on preparing brains for learning. YVONNE BERG/OUR KIDS MEDIA

Neuroscience is coming to the classroom. Or more accurately, our understanding of how a brain develops will change the way we teach, parent, and help our kids to grow and develop. In education, this can be seen in preschools (such as Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia), gifted programs, special needs schools, and language immersion programs.

Over the last decade, our ability to study how the brain works has dramatically improved. Now, the research done by neuroscientists is coming out of the lab and into the classroom.

Here are five ways that education will be changed because of what we've learned about a child's brain:

1. We'll Start to Hear a Lot About "Neuroeducation"

In the future, we'll hear a lot about neuroeducation, and we can expect to see curricula based not just on teaching subjects, but on preparing brains for learning. If you think of the brain as a tree with branches, neuroeducation is the process of adding more branches. If the brain has more branches, a child can learn faster, remember more and have improved IQ. Neuroscience has shown us that it's possible to change the "wiring" of the brain (or to add more branches). This "rewiring" is based on something called neuroplasticity and we'll hear a lot more about it in the years ahead.

2. Changing the Way Kids Study

Our understanding of the brain is leading to remarkable insights into how memories are formed and how we access those memories. These insights are leading to new approaches to helping kids to study and learn. We'll expect to see new insights into helping your kids with their study plans. For example, it turns out that repetition is important but that the brain responds to a "spacing effect." The spacing effect is the finding that when you space learning episodes farther apart in time, you'll remember more information later on than if you mass the learning into one study episode, according to Nicholas Cepeda, associate professor of psychology at York University. Understanding how the brain is "wired" and how memories work will give us new hints on how to help our kids study and remember.

3. Music, Language and the Mind

One of the most pronounced findings of neuroscience is the impact of learning music on cognitive function. The idea became popular when it was called the "Mozart Effect"—but it turns out that listening to music isn't enough. Neuroscience has shown that learning to play an instrument or learning about notes, rhythm and song can have a dramatic impact on how the brain develops. But the breakthrough is in understanding why this happens: that the brain has a capacity to create new connections through things like music, and the impact of those connections is increased IQ, memory and attention. So expect to hear a lot of support for music programs in schools over the coming years!

4. The Bilingual Advantage

Similar to music, learning a second language has a direct impact on how the brain develops and grows. And the impact can be unexpected: a child who has learned English and French will perform better than a child who grew up learning English onlyin English!

5. The Parenting Advantage

What a child does in school goes hand-in-hand with what happens in the home. The advantages on the brain of a great school program, for example, are only fully realized when parents play a role in their child's development. Some of the findings of neuroscience are common sense. Diet and exercise help the brain, for example. But some of them are less obvious: how you reward and encourage a child only works to improve the brain if it's done a specific way, for example.

—Doug Thompson
Advertisement
Find Private Schools:

In the spotlight:

  • A place for children

    Maria Montessori wanted kids to be kids, allowing them to learn in ways that were social and engaging. She would have loved the York School. [Read more]

Latest Articles


July 28, 2021
Stuart Grainger, Trinity College School
“If you’re a genuine educator, a genuine teacher, you just want to have an impact on a kid's life.”

June 22, 2021
A place for children
The York School is not specifically a Montessori school. But Maria Montessori would have loved it, nonetheless: the school is animated by a passionate focus on making learning hands-on, social and engaging.

May 26, 2021
Why your school needs Zebra Robotics
For many educators it’s been a struggle to meet the requirements of the new Ontario coding curriculum. What if they didn’t have to?

May 5, 2021
The evolution and controversies of online learning in the classroom
Perspectives, opinions, and debates

May 4, 2021
The pros and cons of online learning in schools
The viability of an online learning school

By logging in or creating an account, you agree to Our Kids' Terms and Conditions. Information presented on this page may be paid advertising provided by the advertisers [schools/camps/programs] and is not warranted or guaranteed by OurKids.net or its associated websites. By using this website, creating or logging into an Our Kids account, you agree to Our Kids' Terms and Conditions. Please also see our Privacy Policy. Our Kids ™ © 2020 All right reserved.

Sign up to receive our exclusive eNews twice a month.

You can withdraw consent by unsubscribing anytime.


Name

Email

verification image, type it in the box

 


Our Kids  From Our Kids, Canada’s trusted source for private schools, camps, and extracurriculars.