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Applying to private schools in Poland

The application process for private and non-public schools in Poland



Private schools in Poland offer exciting opportunities for students: there will be new friends, challenging class work, sports, and extracurricular activities. This includes schools in Warsaw, Kraków, Poznań, Wrocław, Łódź, Gdańsk, Szczecin, Bydgoszcz, Lublin, and Rzeszów. But in order for your child to have a great private school experience, you must first find the right school for them, and apply.  continue reading...


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When applying to private schools in Poland, student’s overall suitability or fit is considered. This is assessed in a variety of ways. Some schools require students to take a standardized test and interview with them, with and/or without their parents. Once this is all completed, you’ll need to wait patiently for an answer.

Applying doesn't need to be stressful, though—not if you take your time to find the right fit and consider your child's needs along the way. Also, listen to what your child wants, keeping in mind that the older a child is, the more involved they can be in the process.

Before applying

Sometimes what you do at the beginning of the application process can make all the difference in the world. Before you apply, bear in mind the following helpful points:

What’s required in an application

Poland private schools vary in their application requirements. They ask for a different types of materials and have school-specific deadlines.

Make sure to stay on top of application deadlines and schedules, and what will be required of you. This can make the application process far more manageable, especially if you’re planning on applying to several schools.

While private schools in Poland have different application requirements, many will ask for at least the following:

In some cases, though, they may also ask for:

For the upper years, especially in competitive, academic schools, your child may also be asked to write an entrance exam and/or an essay.

Preparing the application

Once you've chosen the private schools you want to apply to it's time to fill out applications. As long as you have all of your deadline dates straight, and your supporting documentation ready, completing applications shouldn’t be too difficult or stressful.

It’s a good idea to include as much information as possible on the application. For instance, if your child has as special need, such as a learning disability, make sure to specify this. School admissions departments consistently say it's best to be upfront about all your child’s needs and special circumstances. This can help them determine whether they can support your child and maximize your child’s chances for success.

If you've missed an application deadline for any reason, don't give up. While it may be tough in the more competitive schools to apply outside of deadline dates, others are more flexible—and either way, it never hurts to ask.

Meeting schools face-to-face: the interview

While filling out the application is an important part of the process, so is the interview. Most private and non-public schools in Poland will want some face-to-face time with prospective students, either with their parents present or on their own. Depending on the age of your child and the school itself, this might be a formal interview or something less official.

Each school has its own set of criteria they will prioritize for the interview. Many, though, look for traits such as intellectual curiosity and a love of learning, as well as an eagerness to get involved in the community, and the ability to get along with peers and adults.

Don't be afraid to call the school ahead of time to talk about the interview and what might be asked. Finally, while practice may be helpful, don’t over-practice. Schools dislike over-rehearsed answers—they need students to speak honestly to get a genuine picture of them and their suitability for the school.

Standardized tests and results

Kids might dread them, but schools need to know where students are academically, and tests can help give a sense of this. Many Poland schools will rely on past report cards, but depending on the school and student's age, private schools may use in-house or standardized tests to get a fuller picture of where your child stands academically compared to other students of his or her age.

Familiarize your child with the format of the exam they'll be taking to help to make them feel more comfortable come test day. You should also help your child keep the importance of the test in perspective, as it’s only one part of the application (and schools vary in the emphasis they place on it).

Dealing with schools’ responses and final steps

With your applications in, and the tests and interviews done, the next step is just waiting it out, to see if your child gets into any of your schools of choice. When the responses from schools start coming in, be careful not to personalize any disappointment if your child doesn't get accepted. In a lot of cases, there's also the chance—if your child didn't get in this time around—to apply again in the future, if its seems appropriate.

On the other hand, getting accepted can come with stress too. Some private schools in specific areas of Poland will often coordinate their responses so that parents can make an informed choice, knowing where their child stands with all of the schools they've applied to. But there can also be cases where you might still be waiting to hear back from your school of choice, uncertain what to do with your acceptances in hand until you know where the preferred school stands.

Even if deadlines are looming and schools are waiting for your response, don’t panic. A simple phone call to the school you've already heard from explaining your situation is often met with a reassuring response.

In summary: application advice

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Disclaimer: We cannot guarantee the complete accuracy of the school information on this site. Please contact schools directly to confirm all details.